Labor History Booklist

Source: Rosemary Feurer, Labor History Links, 2019

This page is organized with an emphasis on the most recent work in the field, as well as the most important work of scholars from the past. some sections are more developed than others.

Categories include:
Chronological
• Colonial thru Early Nineteenth Century
• Slavery
• Late 19th through early 20th
• Working Class Formation/Working Class Community Studies 1850-1950
• Twentieth Century Approaches and overviews
• Labor and Radicalism late 19th early 20th
• IWW early 20th
• World War I
• Interwar Years/1930s
• World War II
• Cold War & Labor-Anticommunism/Red Scare
• Postwar-present
• Capital Disinvestment in recent years

Topical
• Books that are highly readable
• Books for Children
• Overviews and Surveys of Labor History
• Documents Collections
• Essay Collections
• Biographies and Oral Histories
• U.S. Labor History in Global/Transnational Perspective
• Interpretations of Class in the USA
• Managerial Strategies /Bourgeois Class Formation
• Professionals and Class Issues
• Working Class Cultures/Cultures of the Workplace
• Exceptionalism (why no Labor Party/Socialism)
• Labor and the State/Labor and the Law
• Unemployment/Hours/Leisure
• African-American Labor History/Race and Labor
• Latinos/Latinas in US Labor History
• Labor Rights & Civil Rights
• Immigration Ethnicity and Labor History
• Women/Gender/Labor and Feminism
• War and the Working Class/War and Labor
• Labor and the Environment
• Specific trades/industries
• Geographical treatments
• Unions and Corruption

Red State Strikes and the Roots of Teacher Militancy

Source: Jon Shelton, LAWCHA: The Labor and Working-Class History Association Newsletter, 2018

…. These strikes were among the most important victories in the US in recent history, a clear victory for communities decimated by years of Republican-led austerity. Further, the cross-district teacher strikes this past spring seemed especially shocking because of the right’s decades-long characterization of teacher unions as inimical to the interests of the nation’s children, there has actually been labor peace among teachers and school districts going back 30 years now. The strike wave surprised many observers, particularly since they took place in conservative, “right-to-work” states where public employee strikes are illegal. Yet this new era of teacher unionism builds on a long history of teacher militancy. ….

The Budget and Economic Outlook: 2019 to 2029

Source: Congressional Budget Office, pub. no. 54918, January 2019

From the summary:
In CBO’s projections, the federal budget deficit is about $900 billion in 2019 and exceeds $1 trillion each year beginning in 2022. Because of persistently large deficits, federal debt held by the public is projected to grow steadily, reaching 93 percent of GDP in 2029.

Real GDP is projected to grow by 2.3 percent in 2019—down from 3.1 percent in 2018—as the effects of the 2017 tax act on the growth of business investment wane and federal purchases decline sharply in the fourth quarter of 2019. Economic growth is projected to slow to an average of 1.7 percent through 2023 and to average 1.8 percent from 2024 to 2029.

Related:
Visual summary
Director’s statement

DC region, usually buttressed by federal presence, bears brunt of shutdown

Source: Nicholas Samuels,Timothy Blake, Matthew Butler, Pisei Chea, Marcia Van Wagner, Maria Matesanz, Moody’s, Sector Comment, January 24, 2019
(subscription required)

The federal government usually benefits the national capital region’s economy, driving high education and wealth levels, knowledge-based employment and providing a buffer during an economic downturn. But the partial federal shutdown, already the longest ever at five weeks, illustrates the drawbacks of the concentrated federal presence in the District of Columbia (DC) metro area, a significant contributor to the larger US economy. The DC area is absorbing the worst of the federal shutdown with missed pay for employees and private sector contractors reducing personal spending and tempering tax revenue for area governments. Federal workers will miss another payday January 25. In addition, public transit ridership has slowed, and operations at other government enterprises are experiencing disruption

Not-for-profit healthcare and higher education – US – New accounting standard for operating leases is credit neutral

Source: Rita Sverdlik, Lisa Martin, Lisa Goldstein, Diane F. Viacava, Susan I Fitzgerald, Kendra M. Smith, Moody’s, Sector Comment, January 23, 2019
(subscription required)

New guidance from the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) related to operating leases took effect January 1. Under the new standard, issuers will include the net present value (NPV) of operating leases on the balance sheet. This change does not affect issuers’ credit quality because our assessments already consider operating leases in a manner similar to the new FASB standard. However, in a few limited circumstances, the accounting change will affect issuers’ compliance with financial covenants in bond and bank agreements and temporarily elevate credit risk.

Automation and Artificial Intelligence: How machines are affecting people and places

Source: Mark Muro, Robert Maxim, and Jacob Whiton, Brookings Institution, January 2019

From the summary:
At first, technologists issued dystopian alarms about the power of automation and artificial intelligence (AI) to destroy jobs. Then came a correction, with a wave of reassurances. Now, the discourse appears to be arriving at a more complicated understanding, suggesting that automation will bring neither apocalypse nor utopia, but instead both benefits and stress alike. Such is the ambiguous and sometimes disembodied nature of the “future of work” discussion.

Hence the analysis presented here. Intended to bring often-inscrutable trends down to earth, the following report develops both backward and forward-looking analyses of the impacts of automation over the years 1980 to 2016 and 2016 to 2030 to assess past and upcoming trends as they affect both people and communities in the United States.

The report focuses on areas of potential occupational change rather than net employment losses or gains. Special attention is applied to digging beneath national top-line statistics to explore industry, geographical, and demographic variations. Finally, the report concludes by suggesting a comprehensive response framework for national and state-local policymakers.

Related:
Executive summary
Data appendices
Press release
Infographic

Rural people with disabilities are still struggling to recover from the recession

Source: Lillie Greiman, Andrew Myers, Bryce Ward, Catherine Ipsen, The Conversation, January 28, 2019

After the devastating losses of the Great Recession, the U.S. has enjoyed one of the longest expansions in its recorded history. For nearly 100 straight months, the U.S. economy has added jobs.

But not all groups have shared equally in the recovery. African-Americans and people in rural communities have been particularly slow to recover, compared to their white and urban peers.

Our team at the University of Montana’s Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities published a new analysis on Jan. 10. Our research shows that people with disabilities, particularly those in rural areas, have also experienced a longer, deeper recession and a much slower recovery. ….

The Gender Disparity in Climbing Local Government’s Ladder

Source: Katherine Barrett & Richard Greene, Governing, January 28, 2019

Women are less likely than men to aspire for and occupy top jobs. They’re also less optimistic about their chances of moving up at all.

…. Late last year, National Research Center, Inc., released data it had collected over the last five years from 20,000 local government workers in more than 40 jurisdictions. Its survey reveals some gender disparities: 39 percent of men rated their opportunities for promotion as excellent or good, compared to only 29 percent of women. And 49 percent of men rated their opportunities for career growth as excellent or good, compared to just 43 percent of women. ….