Four-Day Working Week Trial

Source: Perpetual Guardian, 2018

Perpetual Guardian is embarking on a world-first: we are running an unprecedented productivity trial for six weeks, starting 5 March. As part of the trial, all our staff – more than 200 people around New Zealand – are being offered a free day off every week. All other employment conditions, including remuneration, are unchanged. Andrew Barnes, our founder and CEO, says the decision to test the new way of working is “the right thing to do.” He was inspired to conduct the trial by several global productivity reports and our recent internal survey, which asked staff how productivity, innovation and engagement can grow. …..

Related:
A 4-Day Workweek? A Test Run Shows a Surprising Result
Source: Charlotte Graham-McLay, New York Times, July 19, 2018

A New Zealand firm that let its employees work four days a week while being paid for five says the experiment was so successful that it hoped to make the change permanent. The firm, Perpetual Guardian, which manages trusts, wills and estates, found the change actually boosted productivity among its 240 employees, who said they spent more time with their families, exercising, cooking, and working in their gardens…..
Four-day working week trial at New Zealand company so successful its boss wants to make it permanent
Source: Tom Embury-Dennis, The Independent, July 19, 2018

A four-day working week trial at a company in New Zealand was so successful its boss wants to make it permanent. The firm, which deals with wills and trust funds, conducted the eight-week experiment earlier this year. It saw its 240-strong workforce, in 16 offices across the country, retain full pay alongside a three-day weekend. Andrew Barnes, chief executive of Perpetual Guardian, said he had made a recommendation to the board to continue the policy after an analysis revealed a “massive increase” in staff satisfaction with no drop in productivity. The research, Mr Barnes said, was conducted by two independent academics drafted to ensure an objective analysis of the impact on the company and workforce.

Research suggests there’s a case for the 3-hour workday
Source: Chris Weller, Business Insider, September 27, 2017
– The average worker spends most of the eight-hour workday doing many other things beside work, including eating, socialising, or reading the news.
– Psychologists have found the brain can’t focus on tasks for more than a few hours at a time.
– Some companies have started adjusting their schedules to help employees maximise their efficiency.

In Sweden, an Experiment Turns Shorter Workdays Into Bigger Gains
Source: Liz Alderman, New York Times, May 20, 2016

Arturo Perez used to come home frazzled from his job as a caregiver at the Svartedalens nursing home. Eight-hour stretches of tending to residents with senility or Alzheimer’s would leave him sapped with little time to spend with his three children. But life changed when Svartedalens was selected for a Swedish experiment about the future of work. In a bid to improve well-being, employees were switched to a six-hour workday last year with no pay cut. Within a week, Mr. Perez was brimming with energy, and residents said the standard of care was higher. …. The experiment at Svartedalens goes further by mandating a 30-hour week. An audit published in mid-April concluded that the program in its first year had sharply reduced absenteeism, and improved productivity and worker health. ….