Raise Anatomy: How to Ask for a Raise and Get It

Source: PayScale, Inc., June 2018

From the press release:
Today, PayScale, Inc., the world’s leading provider of precise, on-demand compensation data and software, released new research showing which employees are asking for pay raises and which employees are receiving them. This study is designed to educate both employees and employers about biases which may impact pay decisions in an effort to achieve equitable pay raises regardless of race or gender. One of the key findings from the “Raise Anatomy” report is that white men are far more likely to actually get a raise when they ask for it than a person of color. ….

Key findings from the report:
• The majority of employees (70 percent) who asked for a raise received at least some pay increase.
• Of those who asked for a raise, 39 percent of employees got the amount they requested, while 31 percent received a smaller raise than requested.
• People of color were significantly less likely than white men to have received a raise when they asked for one. Women of color were 19 percent less likely to have received a raise than a white man and men of color were 25 percent less likely. (Note: No single gender or racial/ethnic group was more likely to have asked for a raise than any other group.)
• The most common justification for denying a raise was budgetary constraints (49 percent). Only 22 percent of employees who heard this rationale actually believed it.
• One third of workers report that no rationale was provided when they were denied a raise.
• When workers don’t believe the rationale, or aren’t provided one, they reported lower rates of satisfaction with their employer and reported being more likely to quit.
• Of those who said that they did not ask for a raise, 30 percent reported their reason for not asking was they received a raise before they felt the need to ask their manager.
• Employees who are most satisfied with their work and their employers are those who agreed with the statement: “I’ve always been happy with my salary.” ….

Related:
How to boost your odds of getting a raise: Ask for one, and be a white man
Source: Rachel Siegel, Washington Post, June 6, 2018