Predictors of Intent to Leave the Job Among Home Health Workers: Analysis of the National Home Health Aide Survey

Source: Robyn Stone, Jess Wilhelm, Christine E. Bishop, Natasha S. Bryant, Linda Hermer, and Marie R. Squillace, The Gerontologist, Advance Access, First published online: April 21, 2016
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From the abstract:
Purpose: To identify agency policies and workplace characteristics that are associated with intent to leave the job among home health workers employed by certified agencies.

Design and Methods: Data are from the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey/National Home Health Aide Survey, a nationally representative, linked data set of home health and hospice agencies and their workers. Logistic regression with survey weights was conducted to identify agency and workplace factors associated with intent to leave the job, controlling for worker, agency, and labor market characteristics.

Results: Job satisfaction, consistent patient assignment, and provision of health insurance were associated with lower intent to leave the job. By contrast, being assigned insufficient work hours and on-the-job injuries were associated with greater intent to leave the job after controlling for fixed worker, agency, and labor market characteristics. African American workers and workers with a higher household income also expressed greater intent to leave the job.

Implications: This is the first analysis to use a weighted, nationally representative sample of home health workers linked with agency-level data. The findings suggest that intention to leave the job may be reduced through policies that prevent injuries, improve consistency of client assignment, improve experiences among African American workers, and offer sufficient hours to workers who want them.