Tag Archives: Ohio

White Hat Management Leaves Ohio Charter Industry

Source: Mitch Felan, WKSU, August 8, 2018
 
White Hat Management, the once-prolific Ohio charter school operator and early advocate for school choice in the state, is leaving the charter school business. The company has been steadily losing contracts over the past few years in the competitive market. …

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When it comes to facing down Ohio’s well-heeled charter school lobbyists, will state lawmakers be leaders — or lapdogs?
Source: Brent Larkin, Northeast Ohio Media Group, July 24, 2015

…… In the past 17 years, Ohio’s two largest charter school management companies — David Brennan’s Akron-based White Hat Management and William Lager’s Columbus-based Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT) — have funneled more than $6 million to Republican candidates and causes. In the last election cycle, ECOT alone gave more than $400,000. The payoff? About $1.76 billion in taxpayer money has flowed into charter schools run by Brennan and Lager since 1998.

Start the investigation of the state Department of Education
Source: Editorial Board, Beacon Journal, July 18, 2015

Let the formal investigation begin, preferably by David Yost, the state auditor, or an independent investigator tapped by the State Board of Education. The target? The Ohio Department of Education, its director of school choice admitting last week that he removed or ignored failing grades for online and dropout recovery charter schools as part of evaluating the performance of sponsors, those organizations that oversee the publicly funded yet privately run schools.

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Council approves second year of Rumpke contract as costs continue to rise

Source: Rick Rouan, The Columbus Dispatch, April 9, 2018

No savings have emerged more than a year after Columbus agreed to pay its vendor more to collect recycling and yard waste with the caveat that it would seek new ways to trim its costs. City Council on Monday voted 6-1 to approve the second year of an anticipated five-year agreement for curbside recycling and yard waste collection. The city will pay Cincinnati-based Rumpke about $8.7 million in 2018, up from about $8.5 million last year. … The city is paying significantly more for recycling and yard waste collections now than it did when it launched curbside pickups in 2012.Rumpke has been the city’s vendor since the curbside pickups began. The company held a five-year contract, and when that came up for renewal last year Rumpke was the only bidder for a new five-year deal. Rumpke’s bid was 50 percent higher than its first deal, though, citing a depressed market for recyclables and other factors that contributed to the increase. …

Despite 34 making six figures, true amounts of JobsOhio salaries still lowballed

Source: Randy Ludlow, Columbus Dispatch, March 12, 2018
 
JobsOhio continues to under report the amounts it pays employees — including 34 workers who make at least six-figure annual salaries — in a move that could run contrary to state law. In its 2017 filings with the state, Gov. John Kasich’s privatized economic development agency again reported employees’ taxable income — which does not include salary diverted to non-taxable retirement contributions and health insurance costs — instead of their gross income. State law requires the nonprofit to report “total compensation.” But its practice of reporting only taxable income serves to understate employee earnings by thousands of dollars each. …

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Justices again rule JobsOhio can’t be challenged
Source: Randy Ludlow, Columbus Dispatch, August 31, 2016

The Ohio Supreme Court stood on identical ground Wednesday to reject another attempt to declare JobsOhio unconstitutional. In a 6-1 vote, the court ruled that Victoria Ullmann, a Columbus lawyer, lacked the legal right — or standing — to pursue her action seeking to declare Gov. John Kasich’s privatized economic development agency as illegal. … The court threw out another challenge to JobsOhio in 2014 on grounds the parties lacked proper standing, leaving some to question then if the legality of the nonprofit could ever be questioned in the courts. Ullmann argued she had standing to sue since she, and other Ohioans, support JobsOhio through their purchase of liquor, the profits from which support the entity under its long-term lease of state’s liquor sales enterprise. … Ullmann sued Kasich, Secretary of State Jon Husted and Auditor Dave Yost, asking that the court order the Republicans to take steps to dissolve JobsOhio. A spokesman for Attorney General Mike DeWine, who defended the officeholders, said his office was pleased with the ruling. … JobsOhio reported earlier this year it attracted a record 23,602 new jobs and $6.7 billion in corporate investment in 2015. The agency reported revenue of slightly more than $1 billion last year, largely from the state’s liquor-sales operation, which racked up record sales last year to produce net income of $235.2 million. …

Liberal group’s challenge to JobsOhio rejected by Ohio Supreme Court
Source: Jackie Borchardt, Northeast Ohio Media Group, June 10, 2014

Ohio’s highest court on Tuesday rejected a challenge from a progressive group and two Democrats challenging the constitutionality of JobsOhio, the state’s private, nonprofit economic development agency. In a 5-2 decision, the Supreme Court held that ProgressOhio.org, state Sen. Michael Skindell of Lakewood and former state Rep. Dennis Murray do not have standing — the legal right to pursue its claim in court — to bring an action against the legislation that created JobsOhio. The court also held that the plaintiffs lack a personal stake in the outcome of the case.

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America’s Rural Hospitals Are Dangerously Fragile

Source: Brian Alexander, The Atlantic, January 9, 2018

… Last November, however, Circleville’s voters chose another direction, one that, in other places, has resulted in an economic hit to the community—mostly in the form of job losses and stagnant wages—as well as a lowered quality of care. At the urging of city and county leaders, and Berger’s administrators, residents voted to allow local politicians and the hospital’s board to begin a process to turn Berger, one of the last publicly owned and operated hospitals in the state, into a nonprofit private corporation. Following that, Berger would most likely be integrated into a larger regional system, probably the Columbus-based nonprofit Ohio Health, with which Berger has an ongoing relationship. …
 
… Hospitals have been struggling—especially independent public and/or nonprofit hospitals located in smaller cities and rural towns. Last year, for example, the National Rural Health Association, a nonprofit, estimated that 673 rural facilities (with a variety of ownership structures) were at risk of closure, out of over 2,000. And with the new tax legislation, and events like the merger of the drugstore chain CVS and the insurer Aetna, the turmoil looks to get worse. In response, stand-alone nonprofit hospitals have been auctioning off their real estate to investors, selling themselves to for-profit chains or private-equity firms, or, like Berger, folding themselves into regional health systems. …

Editorial: Laketran, Painesville Township applauded for cost-saving efforts

Source: The News-Herald, December 2, 2017

… At Laketran, an idea that will save money and potentially produce revenue arose after the transit agency began having difficulty finding vendors to perform alignments on its 35-foot transit buses and 40-foot commuter coaches. As Bare considered alternatives, he came up with an idea that led back to Laketran’s own maintenance garage. He suggested Laketran bring alignment service in-house with potential to sell the services through governmental agency contracts. … “We believe there are other governmental agencies, like the county or local school districts, that may be having the same difficulties,” said Laketran General Manager Ben Capelle. “Once our maintenance department is trained and we have a general idea of how much time the alignment will take, we plan to offer alignment services to governmental agencies within Lake County. … So with a state-of-the art alignment machine and a staff of highly skilled mechanics, Laketran has positioned itself to not only save on maintenance expenses for its own bus fleet, but also to work with other governmental agencies who need similar work done on their buses or trucks. The concept of regionalism — government entities from different nearby communities sharing services, personnel or programs to save money for all parties involved — has become quite popular in recent years. So give Laketran credit for seeing how doing alignment services in-house was a smart idea. …

Group pushes for answers over potential sale of library building

Source: WLWT, December 12, 2017

Potential plans to close the Cincinnati Library’s north building has sparked some concerns, and a local group is demanding answers. The “Our Library, Our Decision!” coalition is on a mission to stop the library from the sale. More than 20 people with the group attended the library board’s monthly meeting Tuesday, expressing their concerns. “We called out the board and administration as, at this point, being basically incompetent and untrustworthy,” said member Charles Campbell. … Including Campbell, 3,000 people signed a petition opposing the potential sale, which the coalition hand-delivered to the board. …

Monroe County Commissioners hear engineer requests

Source: Dylan McKenzie, Times Leader, December 5, 2017

The Monroe County Engineer’s Office brought several items before the county commissioners Monday, including the possibility of contracting out for grass mowing services. County Engineer Amy Zwick talked with commissioners about the possibility of hiring outside help for grass mowing services in the future. Zwick said her employees are members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees union, and the county is in the process of negotiating a contract with the union. Zwick said that depending on how negotiations go, the county might have to lay off some employees, which would force her to look for help with services that are not strictly essential to the county, such as grass mowing. She asked the commissioners if it would be possible for them to contract directly through their office to get the mowing done if necessary, adding that even if negotiations go well she would still need new tractors for mowing, which could be expensive. …

County services for disabled moving to private providers

Source: Rita Price, Columbus Dispatch, October 30, 2017
 
Federal rule changes about case management and Medicaid payments are forcing county disabilities boards throughout the state to privatize and outsource many of their remaining programs. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has mandated “conflict-free case management” by 2024 in Ohio, which means counties cannot be both the coordinator and the provider of services paid with Medicaid waiver funds.  But county boards still must pay for services and put up the local share of the Medicaid match — in Franklin County, more than $60 million a year for adult waiver services. Medicaid waivers provide money for community-based services so that people don’t have to be in an institution to get the care and programs they need. … Some 300 members of the county’s adult-services staff are to become ARC Industries employees in January 2019. … ARC is the disabilities program that provides job training, workshop employment, transportation and other services. Although ARC already was a nonprofit employer for people with disabilities, the workshops and programs have been staffed by county employees. Early childhood and school programs can continue to be operated by the board because they’re not funded through Medicaid waivers. … Initially, Morison said, the board’s costs might increase as a new infrastructure is established. He expects it to even out in coming years. …

Don’t mess with RITA in Niles recovery plan

Source: The Vindicator, July 31, 2017
 
Last week, the Niles Financial Planning and Supervision Commission, the state-appointed panel overseeing the city’s recovery, put its stamp of approval on the seventh rendition of a plan authored by Mayor Thomas Scarnecchia and approved by city council. It lays out a road map for cost-cutting and capital improvements for the beleaguered city of 19,000 people over the next five years.  Among its more noteworthy features include implementation of two $5 license-plate fees to generate about $180,000 a year, borrowing of $1.6 million to make critically needed improvements to crumbling city buildings and dismantling the city’s income-tax department.  That latter move to outsource most income-tax functions of city government to the Regional Income Tax Agency operated in connection with the Council of Regional Governments has ignited a firestorm of opposition from some within city government, most notably the leadership of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 506 in the city. …

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Niles deciding whether to outsource income tax collection
Source: Stan Boney, WKBN, July 14, 2017
 
It appears Niles will have a five-year plan — which includes outsourcing income tax collection to an agency outside of the city — to get out of fiscal emergency. But not everyone agrees with it.  The plan would replace the Niles Income Tax Department with the Regional Income Tax Agency, known as RITA. … Bob Ward, president of the AFSCME Local 506 — a union representing the income tax workers, said he’s not in agreement with it.  He showed WKBN a grievance from 2016 — which the union won — preventing RITA from taking over.  Ward said they’ll file another grievance if need be. …

Ohio’s spending on private IT contracts balloons under Kasich

Source: Randy Ludlow, Columbus Dispatch, May 14, 2017 

State spending on information-technology consultants, contractual employees and other private services has ballooned to $452 million a year, while the number of generally less-expensive state IT employees has dropped.  As part of a preliminary inquiry into no-bid contracts uncovered by The Dispatch, the office of Ohio Auditor Dave Yost reports that spending on IT “personal services” has more than doubled from $207 million in 2011-12. … A Dispatch investigation published last month revealed that Administrative Services officials overrode the concerns — both legal and financial — of agency purchasing analysts to award millions of dollars in no-bid contracts, including to a company employing former state IT executives. Supervisors deny disregarding the agency’s purchasing policy and sidestepping the protocol of the state Controlling Board, a bipartisan group that approves major state outlays. The House-passed state budget includes language authored by Rep. Keith Faber, R-Celina, requiring state officials to seek bids on all IT consultants and purchases. The provision also would require such contracts to be submitted to the Controlling Board for its approval.