St. Luke’s sues prison contractor over $12 million in medical bills

Source: Audrey Dutton, Idaho Statesman, July 16, 2018

St. Luke’s Health System is suing an Idaho prison contractor over $12.6 million in medical bills it says the contractor hasn’t paid. The lawsuit was filed June 28 against Corizon Health, a company hired by the Idaho Department of Correction to provide medical care to Idaho’s inmates. The dispute stems from Corizon’s decision to pay St. Luke’s at the Medicaid rate for services the health system provided between July 1, 2014, and March 26, 2018. The Medicaid rate is “substantially lower” than the rate the health system says Corizon had agreed to pay, according to the lawsuit. St. Luke’s said it should have received 76 percent of its billed charges. St. Luke’s also seeks more than $3 million in interest on the medical bills, as well as a total of more than $600,000 for individual patients’ bills it says Corizon underpaid. … The lawsuit is the second filed by Idaho health care providers against the contractor. Saint Alphonsus Health System in April sued Corizon over similar claims, saying it was owed $14 million for medical care to inmates. Saint Al’s also sought $5 million in interest from the allegedly unpaid bills. …

Related:

Prison violations led to amputations and death, Idaho inmates say
Source: Associated Press, March 27, 2017

Idaho inmates are asking a federal judge to penalize the state after saying prison officials repeatedly violated a settlement plan in a long-running lawsuit over health care, leading to amputations and other serious injuries and even some prisoners’ deaths. In a series of documents filed in federal court, the inmates’ attorney Christopher Pooser painted a bleak and often gruesome picture of the alleged problems at the Idaho State Correctional Institution south of Boise. The prison is the state’s oldest, with more than 1,400 beds, including special units for chronically ill, elderly and disabled inmates. Pooser and the inmates allege some prisoners were forced to undergo amputations after their blisters and bedsores went untreated and began to rot, and others with serious disabilities were left unbathed or without water for extended periods and given food only sporadically. The prison’s death rates outpaced the national average as well as rates at other Idaho facilities, according to the documents. And despite hearing evidence to the contrary, prison officials failed to double-check the numbers when its health care contractor, Corizon, reported being 100 percent compliant with state health care requirements. Meanwhile, prison officials were falsifying documents to make it look like all employees were trained in suicide prevention when many were not, the filings said. The inmates are asking the judge to hold the state in contempt of court and levy more than $24 million in fines against the Idaho Department of Correction. They say the state could cover some of the fines by recovering money paid under its contract with Corizon, but they also want the state to feel the budget hit so prison leaders will be motivated to make a fix. …