2017’s Cities Most Affected by Trumpcare

Source: Richie Bernardo, WalletHub, March 20, 2017

…According to estimates by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, the recently proposed American Health Care Act — unofficially going by the names “Trumpcare” and “Ryancare” — would raise the average health-insurance premium for an individual policyholder by 15 to 20 percent just one or two years from now and lower federal subsidies. In contrast, the CBO projected, average Obamacare premiums would decrease 10 percent by 2026.

In order to gauge the AHCA’s impact on people who buy their own insurance, WalletHub’s analysts compared the differences in premium subsidies that the average households in 457 U.S. cities would receive under Obamacare and Trumpcare. Read on for our findings, commentary from a panel of experts and a full description of our methodology….

Source: WalletHub

Good Intentions versus Effective Outcomes: An Analysis of Selected New Mexico Tax Incentives

Source: Greg LeRoy, Thomas Cafcas and Philip Mattera of Good Jobs First, and Lisa Christensen Gee and Dylan Grundman of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, March 2017

From the blog post:
A study released today examining various tax incentives and tax accounting practices in New Mexico found that the state could gain more than $206 million per year by enacting safeguards common in other states. The study also finds that New Mexico lags behind most other states in making public relevant information about its tax incentive programs.

Those are the main conclusions of “Good Intentions versus Effective Outcomes,” a study released today by Good Jobs First, a non-profit, non-partisan research center.

With Amazon.com’s agreement to collect gross receipts tax on in-state sales, a fair application of the same tax to all online retailers could boost state revenues by almost $42 million. The state also has the opportunity to close a loophole that costs the state at least $27 million by fully enacting combined reporting (which prevents multi-state companies from shifting profits and tax burdens away from New Mexico). The study also recommends the phasing out of the High Wage Jobs Tax Credit program, which costs $70 million per year, and that the state also consider reversing a corporate income tax accounting rule (single sales factor apportionment) that costs the state $45 million per year and has not increased manufacturing jobs.
Related:
Press ReleaseAbstract

The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Health Coverage for Direct Care Worker

Source: Stephen Campbell, PHI, Issue Brief, March 2017

From the summary:
Direct care workers—nursing assistants, home health aides, and personal care aides who support older Americans and people with disabilities—are among America’s lowest paid workers, often struggling to access health coverage. However, new coverage numbers show that this workforce benefited substantially from the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Between 2010 and 2014, half a million direct care workers gained coverage. At the same time, the uninsured rate across this workforce decreased by 26 percent. As the Trump administration and the new Congress consider the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicaid, it is important to consider the impact of these changes on this critical U.S. workforce.

The Fiscal Ship

Source: Brookings Institution – Hutchins Center, Woodrow Wilson Center – Serious Games Initiative, 2017

The Fiscal Ship challenges you to put the federal budget on a sustainable course. Measured as a share of gross domestic product, the federal debt is higher than at any time since the end of World War II and projected to climb to unprecedented levels. America is looking at a permanent, growing mismatch between revenues and spending, and policymakers are faced with difficult decisions about how to reconcile important government priorities—including retirement and health benefits promised to the growing number of old folks—with the tax revenues that the current tax code will yield. Today’s tax code won’t yield enough revenue to pay for basic services of government plus the retirement and health benefits promised to the growing number of old folks. So your mission is to pick from a menu of tax and spending options to reduce the debt from projected levels over the next 25 years. Small changes to spending and taxes won’t suffice. The choices are difficult, but the goal is achievable.

But budget decisions aren’t only about fiscal sustainability. They also shape the kind of country we live in. To win the game, you need to find a combination of policies that match your values and priorities AND set the budget on a sustainable course….

Private Equity Wins Even When It Loses, Thanks to Debt Markets

Source: Nabila Ahmed and Sridhar Natarajan, Bloomberg, March 20, 2017

The Payless shoe company was already on its way to becoming another retail victim of the internet when the private equity guys showed up.

That the firms — Golden Gate Capital Inc. and Blum Capital Partners — weren’t able to turn Payless around after acquiring them in 2012 isn’t so surprising. That they’ve still made out so handsomely is.

As Payless shutters hundreds of stores and struggles to repay $665 million of debt, Golden Gate and Blum turned a profit on the deal. How? By having Payless borrow millions in the financial markets, a move that’s pushing the company to the brink. The firms have collected $350 million from Payless through debt-funded special dividends. Golden Gate and Payless declined to comment and Blum didn’t respond to requests.

Private equity firms have always borrowed to buy companies. But now, with debt so cheap, they’re layering on subsequent borrowing at an unprecedented clip to pay themselves, putting an additional, and at times fatal, financial strain on their newly acquired companies. From the start of 2013, private equity owners have taken out more than $90 billion in debt-funded payouts, according to data compiled by LCD, part of S&P Global Market Intelligence…..

Keeping Families Together: Why All Americans Should Care About What Happens to Unauthorized Immigrants

Source: Silva Mathema, Center for American Progress, March 16, 2017

The main findings of this brief are as follows:
• Nationwide, about 16.7 million people in the country have at least one unauthorized family member living with them in the same household.
• More than 8 million U.S. citizens, of which 1.2 million are naturalized citizens, have at least one unauthorized family member living with them.
• More than 5.9 million citizen children, U.S. born and naturalized, live with at least one family member who is unauthorized.
• California, Texas, and Nevada, are the top three states that will be most heavily affected by an anti-immigrant policy because they have the highest percent of U.S.-born population with at least one unauthorized family member living with them.
• But even states with smaller immigrant populations, such as Nebraska, Arkansas, and Kansas, will also be affected, because they have high percentages of naturalized citizens who have unauthorized family members living in the same household.
See also:
Interactive: State-by-State Estimates of the Family Members of Unauthorized Immigrants

How we built an app that uses worker location history to combat wage theft

Source: Abhinav Suri, freeCodeCamp blog, March 20, 2017

….Furthermore, this study estimates that workers across the country lose a collective of $50 billion per year due to wage theft.

Even though this study was conducted eight years ago, many workers today are still vulnerable to wage theft and therefore must sue to receive their fair monetary compensation. Moreover, the process of creating strong cases for victims of wage theft is difficult and time-consuming. This prospect is difficult because in many situations, clients have no work records, making it difficult for legal clinics seeking damages for that employer to win back the full owed sum.

Frequently, lawyers must rely on the clients to remember and then construct a schedule of their whereabouts for several months, which makes for a weaker case. That is where this story begins.

Over the past semester, my team and I at Hack4Impact had the opportunity to work with Community Legal Services of Philadelphia (CLS), a pro-bono legal clinic which has served over one million low-income Philadelphians since its founding in 1966.

We were tasked with creating a website to analyze a client’s Google Location History and create a timesheet for all the times a client entered and exited a user-inputted workplace. Since most of CLS’s clients carried Android phones and had not disabled location history tracking, this solution would prove to be incredibly helpful as a starting point for reconstructing a client’s court-admissible time sheet for their case, saving CLS lawyers + paralegals hundreds of hours…..

A Modern Union for the Modern Economy

Source: Jeffrey M. Hirsch, Joseph Seiner, University of North Carolina School of Law, UNC Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2924833, Last revised: 19 Mar 2017

From the abstract:
Membership in traditional unions has steeply declined over the past two decades. As the White House and Congress are now completely Republican controlled, there promises to be no reversal of this trend in the near future. In the face of this rejection of traditional bargaining efforts, several attempts have been made to create alternative “quasi-union” or “alt-labor” relationships between workers and employers. These arrangements represent a creative approach by workers to have their voices heard in a collective manner, though still falling far short of the traditional protections afforded by employment and labor law statutes.

This Article critiques one such high-profile, quasi-union effort in the technology sector—the Uber Guild. While the Guild does not provide any of the traditional bargaining protections found in the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), it offers Uber drivers some input over the terms and conditions under which they work. Falling somewhere between employment-at-will and unionization protected under the NLRA, the Uber Guild is a creative attempt to help both workers and the company to better understand how they can improve the working relationship.

This Article navigates the Uber Guild and other nontraditional efforts that promise a collective voice for workers in the face of a precipitous decline in union membership. Closely examining the implications of these existing quasi-union relationships, this Article explores how workers in the technology sector face unique challenges under workplace laws. We argue that these workers are particularly well situated to benefit from a nontraditional union model and explain what that model should look like. While there can be no doubt that a traditional union protected by the NLRA is the optimal bargaining arrangement, we must consider the enormous challenges workers in the technology sector face in obtaining these protections. A modern union is needed for the modern economy.

Supreme Court vacancy, 2017: An overview

Source: Ballotpedia, 2017

On January 31, 2017, President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch to succeed Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court. Scalia was a member of the U.S. Supreme Court for three decades. If confirmed, Gorsuch would be the seventh justice to have once clerked at the Supreme Court, but the first to serve on the court with the justice with whom he clerked. He clerked for Justice Byron White, who was the first Supreme Court clerk to serve as a justice, and for Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is the senior associate justice on the court. ….

Confirmation hearings on Gorsuch’s nomination before the Senate Judiciary Committee began on March 20, 2017.

On March 16, 2016, President Barack Obama nominated the chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, Merrick Garland, to the Supreme Court, but the U.S. Senate took no action on the nomination, returning Garland’s nomination to the president at the sine die adjournment of the 114th Congress on January 3, 2017. The 294-day period set a record for the longest interval from nomination to Senate action for any Supreme Court nominee, besting the 125-day interval attending Justice Louis Brandeis’ nomination in 1916.

Page contents:
Timeline
The announcement
Major players in Gorsuch’s nomination
See also
Footnotes

Related:
Potential nominee profile: Neil Gorsuch
Source: Eric Citron, SCOTUSblog, January 13, 2017

Does Neil Gorsuch Believe in Liberty and Equality for All?
Source: David Gans, New Republic, March 20, 2017
The judge’s selective approach to constitutional originalism raises serious questions about his respect for the Second Founding after the Civil War.

Former Law Student: Gorsuch Told Class Women ‘Manipulate’ Maternal Leave
Source: Arnie Seipel, Nina Totenberg, NPR, March 20, 2017

Neil Gorsuch Has Web of Ties to Secretive Billionaire
Source: Charlie Savage, Julie Turkewitz, New York Times, March 14, 2017

The Lies of Originalism
Source: Matt McManus, Jacobin, March 20, 2017
Neil Gorsuch’s originalist philosophy isn’t uniquely unbiased or respectful of democracy. It’s a handmaiden of American reaction.

Judge Gorsuch and Johnson Resentencing (This is Not a Joke)
Source: Leah M. Litman, University of California, Irvine School of Law, UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2017-07, January 22, 2017
This paper describes an opinion by Judge Gorsuch that addresses when federal criminal defendants may file petitions for habeas corpus to challenge their convictions or sentences.