Post-Secondary Employment Outcomes (PSEO) (Beta)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, April 2018

From the press release:
The U.S. Census Bureau announced the release of the first data sets from a pilot public-use data product on labor market outcomes for college graduates, offering prospective students a useful tool and a fresh perspective in their considerations of post-secondary education. This release covers graduates from the University of Texas System. A release scheduled for later this year will cover students within the Colorado Department of Higher Education. The Census Bureau’s Post-Secondary Employment Outcomes pilot research program is being conducted in cooperation with higher education institutional systems to examine college degree attainment and graduate earnings. Through agreements with the Census Bureau, Texas and Colorado provided administrative education data on enrollment and graduation provided by their university systems, which the Census Bureau matched with national jobs statistics produced by the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics program in the Center for Economic Studies…..

Flawed Judgment in Use of Force Against Students?

Source: Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, Inside Higher Ed, April 19, 2018

Only some college and university police officers are being trained to handle students’ mental health crises, experts say.

….Ideally, university police forces would be trained with a deep 40-hour program called the Memphis model, in which they’re taught how to ease the stress of a student experiencing a mental health break, James said. Developed by the University of Memphis’s Crisis Intervention Team Center, the training introduces cops to victims of mental health crises. The Atlantic reported that officers trained in this method are much less likely to use force when dealing with people with mental health problems…..

Implementing Downsizing Reforms in County Governments

Source: Kuotsai Tom Liou, Mary Ann Feldheim, Public Administration Quarterly, Vol. 42 no. 1, Spring 2018
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
This study examined the implementation of downsizing reforms in U.S. county governments to understand popular strategies considered and to test related influence factors. Based on the analysis of data from a national survey, this study examines the implementation of different downsizing reform strategies and tests the influence of individual and organizational factors on the use of downsizing strategies. The descriptive statistics revealed that county governments are conservative in the implementation of downsizing strategies: the top three strategies are redesigning jobs and positions, combining agency units, and simplifying rules and procedures. Factor analysis results indicated three downsizing groups that support the interest in applying different strategies in structural and cultural changes. The findings of multivariate regression analyses showed that the size of the county budget and the population are related to the downsizing group, which preferred introducing buy-out packages and introducing bottom-up changes. Implications of the research findings are presented for future studies of public management reforms.

Shot on the Way to Work: Is Travel Time Work Time?

Source: Fatima Hussein, Daily Labor Report, April 18, 2018
(subscription required)  

• Worker killed on the way to on-call employment draws questions of travel time to work 
• Consequences of case could affect wage and hour claims in Ohio

After an on-call Ohio hospital worker was fatally shot on his way to work, his widow was awarded a worker’s compensation claim in her late husband’s name. ….

Resistance to school integration in the name of ‘local control’: 5 questions answered

Source: Erica Frankenberg, Kendra Taylor, The Conversation, April 12, 2018

Editor’s note: The word “secession” is often used in reference to states or countries that wish to break off and form their own government. But here in the United States, there are communities that want to secede from their school districts to form their own. One of the latest examples is a case in Gardendale, Alabama, where a court recently ruled that the community’s attempt to leave the Jefferson County, Alabama, school district was motivated by racial discrimination and therefore unconstitutional. In order to gain more insight into what’s driving school district secession efforts, The Conversation reached out to Erica Frankenberg, who has examined the effect of the school secession movement on school segregation in Jefferson County and throughout the nation…..

Why are more people doing gig work? They like it

Source: Cheryl Carleton, The Conversation, March 29, 2018

….The share of Americans doing everything from accounting to driving as independent contractors rose from 10.7 percent in 2005 to 15.8 percent in 2015, according to a study by economists Lawrence Katz at Harvard University and Alan Krueger at Princeton University. The trend was more pronounced among women, they found, rising from 8 to 17 percent.

Based on my prior research regarding labor markets and job satisfaction, I wanted to know if this number was rising so fast partly because Americans enjoy the flexibility these jobs offer….

….The approximately 3,600 people in this nationally representative sample included workers holding down regular jobs, as well as independent contractors and self-employed workers with some degree of control over their schedules. It also included contract employees lacking autonomy and flexibility, such as those working for temp agencies or with on-call obligations.

We also contrasted job satisfaction for employees in managerial or professional roles with workers in blue-collar occupations, and checked whether there were any differences for men and women.

As you might expect, we found that people with more control over their schedules and who could choose to some extent which tasks they would take on are significantly more satisfied with their work than their peers who hold regular salaried jobs – despite losing out on benefits and security…..

State Payroll Taxes: A Tool for States to Circumvent the Republican Tax Plan

Source: Dean Baker, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), February 2018

From the abstract:
The new tax law sharply limits the deduction for state and local taxes (SALT) when calculating federal taxes by capping the deduction at $10,000. While this will not affect most taxpayers, it will affect a substantial number of taxpayers in relatively high tax states like California and New York. This paper suggests an employer-side payroll tax as a tool that states can use to shield most of the tax revenue that otherwise would have been collected through formerly deductible income or sales taxes.