Tag Archives: ARRA

The “Grand Experiment”: An early review of energy-related Recovery Act efforts

Source: Sanya Carley, Martin Hyman, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Political Economy Research Institute (PERI), Working Paper Series, 338 December 2013

From the abstract:
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act injected approximately $840 billion into the U.S. economy for job creation, technological advancement, and infrastructure development. This grand experiment of stimulus support targeted education, health care, unemployment assistance, the environment, and energy programs, among other areas. This study examines energy-related Recovery Act program implementation between 2009 and 2013; areas of inquiry include how funds were allocated and disbursed, which programs were targeted, and the impacts of the Recovery Act. Results indicate that the Recovery Act provided many immediate benefits to the economy, environment, and the energy sector, but also suggest that implementation was hindered by the coordination required between federal, state, and local agencies; reporting and transparency requirements; pre-existing layoffs and furloughs; inexperience with new programs; and inconsistencies with pre-existing laws and regulations. Although some economic and environmental impacts have already been assessed, not all will be known for some time due to the time horizon of the energy-related funding. Further study will be required to quantify the economic and environmental benefits of the renewable energy and energy efficiency programs.

The State Fiscal Stabilization Fund and Higher Education Spending

Source: Jennifer Cohen, New America Foundation, December 9, 2010
Part 1 of 4

From the blog:
While many policy researchers and the media have focused their attention on K-12 education in their reporting on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), few have focused on the law’s effect on higher education funding. Today, the New America Foundation’s Federal Education Budget Project released an issue brief titled The State Fiscal Stabilization Fund and Higher Education Spending in the States that explores how state funding for higher education fluctuated as a proportion of total state spending during the implementation of the ARRA.

Estimated Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on Employment and Economic Output From July 2010 Through September 2010

Source: Congressional Budget Office, November 2010

From the abstract:
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) contains provisions that are intended to boost economic activity and employment in the United States. Section 1512(e) of the law requires the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) to comment on reports filed by recipients of ARRA funding that detail the number of jobs funded through their activities. This CBO report fulfills that requirement. It also provides CBO’s estimates of ARRA’s overall impact on employment and economic output in the third quarter of calendar year 2010. Those estimates–which CBO considers more comprehensive than the recipients’ reports–are based on evidence from similar policies enacted in the past and on the results of various economic models.
See also:
CBO blog post

Recovery Act: Increased Medicaid Funds Aided Enrollment Growth, and Most States Reported Taking Steps to Sustain Their Programs

Source: U.S. Government Accountability Office, GAO-11-58, October 8, 2010

From the summary:
In February 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) initially provided states and the District of Columbia (the District) with an estimated $87 billion in increased Medicaid funds through December 2010, provided they met certain requirements. Funds were made available to states and the District through an increase in the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP), the rate at which the federal government matches state expenditures for most Medicaid services. In March 2010, Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which prohibits states from adopting certain changes to program eligibility in order to receive federal reimbursement, and in August 2010, extended increased FMAP rates through June 2011. GAO was asked to examine issues related to Medicaid funds under the Recovery Act. GAO examined (1) states’ and the District’s access to and use of increased FMAP funds, and (2) states’ and the District’s plans to sustain their Medicaid programs once these funds are no longer available. To do this work, GAO surveyed state Medicaid officials in the 50 states and the District in August 2009 and March 2010 about their program enrollment, uses of funds, program adjustments, and program sustainability. GAO obtained responses from all states and the District. GAO also reviewed CMS data and guidance and interviewed CMS and state officials.

Recovery Act of 2009 – Public Housing Capital Fund: Obligations and Number of Jobs by Zip Code

Source: Todd W. McNeil, Cityscape, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2010

From the abstract:
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) is an unprecedented effort to jumpstart the economy, create or save millions of jobs, and address long-neglected challenges. The Recovery Act investments in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) programs will generate tens of thousands of jobs, modernize homes to make them more energy efficient, and help the families and communities hardest hit by the economic crisis. The Recovery Act includes a $4 billion appropriation for the Public Housing Capital Fund. The Public Housing Capital Fund program is expected to benefit the nation by (1) creating jobs; (2) transforming public housing into energy-efficient, green communities; (3) redeveloping distressed public housing; (4) addressing the needs of public housing residents who are elderly and disabled; and (5) providing funding for public housing projects that lack the private capital to proceed with development.

Recovery Act: Increased Medicaid Funds Aided Enrollment Growth, and Most States Reported Taking Steps to Sustain Their Programs

Source: Government Accountability Office, GAO-11-58, October 8, 2010

From the summary:
In February 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) initially provided states and the District of Columbia (the District) with an estimated $87 billion in increased Medicaid funds through December 2010, provided they met certain requirements. Funds were made available to states and the District through an increase in the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP), the rate at which the federal government matches state expenditures for most Medicaid services. In March 2010, Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which prohibits states from adopting certain changes to program eligibility in order to receive federal reimbursement, and in August 2010, extended increased FMAP rates through June 2011. GAO was asked to examine issues related to Medicaid funds under the Recovery Act. GAO examined (1) states’ and the District’s access to and use of increased FMAP funds, and (2) states’ and the District’s plans to sustain their Medicaid programs once these funds are no longer available. To do this work, GAO surveyed state Medicaid officials in the 50 states and the District in August 2009 and March 2010 about their program enrollment, uses of funds, program adjustments, and program sustainability. GAO obtained responses from all states and the District. GAO also reviewed CMS data and guidance and interviewed CMS and state officials.

More Projects and Paychecks: Transportation’s Summer of Recovery

Source: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), September 2010

The transportation investment in stimulus is working–and in every state across the nation. More than $40 billion in highway and transit projects have been approved and are moving forward–almost $30 billion are under contract on 16,761 different projects. More than 63,000 direct on-project jobs have been created or sustained in August as a result of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and states have already paid out $3.2 billion in payroll.
Related:
February 2010 Report
– View state-by-state analysis of projects and jobs provided by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
– View House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Recovery Act Implementation Report, September 2010.
– View highway miles by state provided by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
– View bridges by state provided by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
– View what progress your state has made

State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: New Federal Funds Help States Weather the Storm

Source: Karen Schulman, Helen Blank, National Women’s Law Center, September 2010

From the summary:
NWLC’s seventh annual report, State Child Care Assistance Policies 2010: New Federal Funds Help States Weather the Storm, reveals that states largely held off major cuts as of February 2010, with help from American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Although most state policies are holding steady compared to a year ago, they have not improved or are behind where they were in 2001. As a result, state policies continue to fall short, particularly in the area of reimbursement rates. The report also includes some information about developments since February 2010 that indicate states may face challenges in protecting their child care programs as ARRA funds are exhausted.

Estimated Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on Employment and Economic Output From April 2010 Through June 2010

Source: Congressional Budget Office, August 2010

From the blog post:
Looking at recorded spending to date as well as estimates of the other effects of ARRA on spending and revenues, CBO has estimated the law’s impact on employment and economic output using evidence about the effects of previous similar policies on the economy and using various mathematical models that represent the workings of the economy. On that basis, CBO estimates that in the second quarter of calendar year 2010, ARRA’s policies:

* Raised the level of real (inflation-adjusted) gross domestic product (GDP) by between 1.7 percent and 4.5 percent,
* Lowered the unemployment rate by between 0.7 percentage points and 1.8 percentage points,
* Increased the number of people employed by between 1.4 million and 3.3 million, and
* Increased the number of full-time-equivalent (FTE) jobs by 2.0 million to 4.8 million compared with what those amounts would have been otherwise. (Increases in FTE jobs include shifts from part-time to full-time work or overtime and are thus generally larger than increases in the number of employed workers.)

Where the Stimulus Went and the Economic Headwind It Faces

Source: Dante Chinni, PBS Newshour, Patchwork Nation, August 11, 2010

In the past year-plus the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act has pumped hundreds of billions into the U.S. economy. Yet, the slump continues. Why? Has the stimulus had an impact? Has it made things better than they would have been without the stimulus – a frequent argument of the Obama administration?

With the help of ProPublica, a non-profit investigative news operation, Patchwork Nation has sorted through the first year of ARRA funding and found two things, both of them somewhat disconcerting.

First, when you look at how the money was disbursed using Patchwork Nation’s 12 county types, the places that need the most help have not done as well as some other communities. Second, even taking that “misplaced disbursement” into account, the money pushed into U.S. communities is significant and still sluggish economy suggests a the hole in the U.S. economy is massive.
Related:
Data Show Stimulus Isn’t Reaching the Nation’s Neediest Counties and States
Source: Marian Wang, ProPublica, August 12, 2010