Category Archives: Workplace Violence/Bullying

Can Mass Shootings be Stopped? To Address the Problem, We Must Better Understand the Phenomenon

Source: Jaclyn Schildkraut Margaret K. Formica Jim Malatras, Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government, May 22, 2018

The mass shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, happened nearly two decades ago, yet it remains etched in the national consciousness. Columbine spurred a national debate — from personal safety to the security of schools, workplaces, and other locations and to broader considerations of guns and mental illness. To this day, communities still are grappling to find solutions to the complex and multifaceted nature of mass shootings.

Adopt Zero Tolerance for Hospital Staff Bullying Nursing Students

Source: John Burkley, AJN The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 118 no. 5, May 2018

Any nursing instructor knows that nursing students are often victims of bullying by hospital staff nurses. Anthony and Yastik (Journal of Nursing Education, 2011) have characterized types of staff incivility toward students as “exclusionary, hostile or rude, or dismissive.” Such incidents are alienating, contribute negatively to learning, and should not be tolerated. It is a shared responsibility of nursing instructors and clinical sites to provide a rich learning environment, and the American Nurses Credentialing Center identifies “nurses as teachers” as one of the 14 characteristics of Magnet hospitals. One recent experience served as an impetus to write this article…..

Sexual Harassment Cases Go Uncounted as Complaint Process Goes Private

Source: Jeff Green, Bloomberg, April 23, 2018

Even as women have begun speaking out about sexual harassment at work, the number of official complaints to state and federal regulators hit a two-decade low in 2017.

The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and its state-level counterparts received just over 9,600 complaints in 2017, according to data obtained by Bloomberg, down from more than 16,000 in 1997—a 41 percent drop.

Workplace violence in healthcare

Source: Journal of Healthcare Protection Management, Vol. 34 no. 1, 2018
(subscription required)

Articles include:

Team Wilson: how a single workplace violence incident changed healthcare security
Robert Rusting
A potential breakthrough in the need for hospital management to recognize the consequences of violence to nurses and other staff members and to take action to upgrade security result from CEO reactions to a horrendous incident in a Massachusetts hospital. The involvement of a nurses’ organization [the Massachusetts Nurses Association] in providing hospital management with the means to deal with the growing violence against staff is also detailed.

Aspects of combating terrorist activities in healthcare
Anthony Luizzo, Ben Scaglione
The keys to maintaining a terrorism-free workplace lies in the security administrator’s mastering of knowing how to capture terrorist threats before they wreak havoc on the institution and its surroundings, according to the authors, who provide in this article a wealth of sources to the administrator for obtaining such a mastery.

OSHA: focusing on healthcare’s continuing increase in workplace violence
Kevin Tuohey
Injuries to nurses, nursing assistants and other healthcare workers continue to be far more prevalent than in other industries and continue to grow in numbers. In this article, the author reviews new efforts to prevent and reduce workplace violence by OSHA and other agencies. He also describes in detail the activities of IAHSS in this area and makes recommendations about maximizing the expertise of healthcare security and safely.

Hospital settlement: OSHA spells out requirements for implementing a WPV program
In a settlement …. with Bergen Regional Medical Center (BRMC) researched in May 2017 and verified in September 2017, OSHA and one of the nation’s largest public hospitals have resolved litigation by reaching an agreement that requires the center to enhance its efforts to prevent violence in the workplace.

Should Managers Be Armed in the Workplace? Employers could be held liable if someone is injured

Source: Lisa Nagele-Piazza, SHRM, March 6, 2018

News of mass shootings and their tragic results have left many people wondering what can be done to prevent or mitigate the consequences of violent acts—including acts committed in the workplace. Should a few trained managers be allowed to carry guns at work? What are the risks and benefits? Employment law attorneys weighed in…..

Women report more rudeness at work from other women

Source: Futurity, February 21, 2018

Women report more incivility from other women at work than from male coworkers, according to a new study.

The phenomenon of women discriminating against other women in the workplace—particularly as they rise in seniority—has long been documented as the “queen bee syndrome.” As women have increased their ranks in the workplace, most will admit to experiencing rude behavior and incivility….

Related:
Further Understanding Incivility in the Workplace: The Effects of Gender, Agency, and Communion
Source: Allison S. Gabriel, Marcus M. Butts, Zhenyu Yuan, Rebecca L. Rosen, Michael T. Sliter, Journal of Applied Psychology, December 14, 2017
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Research conducted on workplace incivility—a low intensity form of deviant behavior—has generally shown that women report higher levels of incivility at work. However, to date, it is unclear as to whether women are primarily treated uncivilly by men (i.e., members of the socially dominant group/out-group) or other women (i.e., members of in-group) in organizations. In light of different theorizing surrounding gender and incivility, we examine whether women experience increased incivility from other women or men, and whether this effect is amplified for women who exhibit higher agency and less communion at work given that these traits and behaviors violate stereotypical gender norms. Across three complementary studies, results indicate that women report experiencing more incivility from other women than from men, with this effect being amplified for women who are more agentic at work. Further, agentic women who experience increased female-instigated incivility from their coworkers report lower well-being (job satisfaction, psychological vitality) and increased work withdrawal (turnover intentions). Theoretical implications tied to gender and incivility are discussed.

The Workplace Violence and Harassment Prevention Kit

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), January 25, 2018

Workplace violence is a serious hazard that many CUPE members face every day. The purpose of the kit is to provide members with resources to help protect them against violence and harassment in the workplace. Far too often, employers develop policies and procedures that only react to violence and harassment. This approach is not good enough. CUPE’s new kit focuses primarily on preventing violence and harassment in the workplace before it happens….

The Workplace Violence and Harassment Prevention Kit includes:
Guideline: Preventing violence and harassment in the workplace
Fact Sheet: Working alone
Violence and harassment legislation in Canada by Jurisdiction
Checklist: Sample violence hazard assessment/inspection
CUPE’s Code of Conduct
CUPE’s Equality Statement
Violent Incident Report
Checklist: Response to a violent incident
Bargaining Guide: Domestic violence in the workplace
Guideline: Stop harassment: a guide for CUPE locals
Workplace harassment and mental injuries: examining root causes
Fact Sheet: What is the duty to accommodate?

City of Discontent? The Influence of Perceived Organizational Culture, LMX, and Newcomer Status on Reported Bullying in a Municipal Workplace

Source: Tracy H. Porter, Nancy Day, Patricia Meglich, Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, Online First, December 19, 2017
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Workplace bullying is a counterproductive behavior that has captured the attention of researchers in recent years. The extent of reported bullying behavior in US organizations varies however; it is estimated to affect 15% to 50% of workers with projected annual costs of over $40 billion including direct and indirect costs. Workplace bullying poses a serious ethical challenge by sending messages about appropriate conduct within the organization’s culture. In this study, we focus on environmental factors as predictors of self-reported bullying in a public-sector organization. Specifically, the factors of interest are organizational culture, commitment to change, and leader-member exchange (LMX). We also investigate newcomer status and its relationship to reported bullying. Findings demonstrated perceived stability in the organization and higher levels of LMX showed lower levels of workplace bullying. Further, an organizational culture that emphasizes rewards lead to higher levels of bullying and newcomers are subjected to more bullying than longer service workers.