Category Archives: Statistics

The increasing importance of Hispanics to the U.S. workforce

Source: Marie T. Mora, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review, September 2015

….The demographic shift with respect to ethnicity has also been striking in recent years. Sparked by immigration and relatively high fertility rates, the number of Hispanics in the civilian U.S. workforce more than doubled, from 10.7 million to 25.4 million workers between 1990 and 2014. This 137-percent increase dwarfed the 13-percent increase in the number of non-Hispanic civilian workers by more than a factor of 10, nearly doubling the representation of Hispanics among all civilian workers during this time (from 8.5 percent to 16.0 percent). Moreover, the growth rate of the number of Hispanic civilian women in the labor force was particularly acute (157 percent) compared with their male counterparts (124 percent) in the past quarter century….

Hispanic Heritage Month 2015

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Facts for Features, CB15-FF.18, September 14, 2015

55 million
The Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2014, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or racial minority. Hispanics constituted 17 percent of the nation’s total population.
Source: 2014 Population Estimates

1.15 million
Number of Hispanics added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2013, and July 1, 2014. This number is close to half of the approximately 2.36 million people added to the nation’s population during this period.
Source: 2014 Population Estimates
National Characteristics: Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic origin
, See first bullet under “Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin”

2.1%
Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between 2013 and 2014.
Source: 2014 Population Estimates
National Characteristics: Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic origin
, See first bullet under “Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin”

119 million
The projected Hispanic population of the United States in 2060. According to this projection, the Hispanic population will constitute 28.6 percent of the nation’s population by that date.
Source: Population Projections , Table 10

64%
The percentage of those of Hispanic origin in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2013. Another 9.5 percent were of Puerto Rican background, 3.7 percent Cuban, 3.7 percent Salvadoran, 3.3 percent Dominican and 2.4 percent Guatemalan. The remainder was of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 American Community Survey, Table B03001

Other sections include: States and Counties, Families and Children, Spanish Language, Income Poverty and Health Insurance, Education, Foreign-Born, Jobs, Voting, and Serving our Country

Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Summary, 2014

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Economic News Release, USDL-15-1789, September 17, 2015

A preliminary total of 4,679 fatal work injuries were recorded in the United States in 2014, an increase of 2 percent over the revised count of 4,585 fatal work injuries in 2013, according to results from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The preliminary rate of fatal work injury for U.S. workers in 2014 was 3.3 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers; the revised rate for 2013 was also 3.3. Revised 2014 data from CFOI will be released in the late spring of 2016. Over the last 5 years, net increases to the preliminary count have averaged 173 cases, ranging from a low of 84 in 2011 (up 2 percent) to a high of 245 in 2012 (up 6 percent). …

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Press Release, Release Number: CB15-157, September 16, 2015

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that in 2014, there was no statistically significant change from 2013 in either real median household income or the official poverty rate. At the same time, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage declined. Unless otherwise noted, the following results for the nation were compiled from information collected in the 2015 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

The nation’s official poverty rate in 2014 was 14.8 percent, which means there were 46.7 million people in poverty. Neither the poverty rate nor the number of people in poverty were statistically different from 2013 estimates. This marks the fourth consecutive year in which the number of people in poverty was not statistically different from the previous year’s estimate.

Median household income in the United States in 2014 was $53,657, not statistically different in real terms from the 2013 median income. This is the third consecutive year that the annual change was not statistically significant, following two consecutive annual declines.

The percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire 2014 calendar year was 10.4 percent, down from 13.3 percent in 2013. The number of people without health insurance declined to 33.0 million from 41.8 million over the period.

These findings are contained in two reports: Income and Poverty in the United States: 2014 and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014. The Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement was conducted between February and April 2015 and collected information about income and health insurance coverage during the 2014 calendar year. The Current Population Survey, sponsored jointly by the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, is conducted every month and is the primary source of labor force statistics for the U.S. population; it is used to calculate the monthly unemployment rate estimates. Supplements are added in most months; the Annual Social and Economic Supplement questionnaire is designed to give annual, calendar-year, national estimates of income, poverty and health insurance numbers and rates.

Another Census Bureau report, The Supplemental Poverty Measure: 2014, was also released today. With support from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it describes research showing a different way of measuring poverty in the United States. The supplemental poverty measure serves as an additional indicator of economic well-being and provides a deeper understanding of economic conditions. The Census Bureau has published poverty estimates using this supplemental measure annually since 2011. Today marks the first time the official poverty measure and the supplemental poverty measure have been released simultaneously.
Related:
Online Webinar, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 10 a.m. EDT
Presentation
Presentation with Plot Points
Remarks

Reports and Data Tables
Income and Poverty in the United States: 2014
Source: Carmen DeNavas-Walt and Bernadette D. Proctor, U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, P60-252, September 2015
Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014
Source: Jessica C. Smith and Carla Medalia, U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, P60-253, September 2015
The Supplemental Poverty Measure: 2014
Source: Kathleen Short, U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, P60-254, September 2015
Complete set of poverty thresholds
Health Insurance Coverage Data
Income data
Poverty data

Women Gain 107,000 Jobs in August and Men Gain 66,000 Jobs

Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research, IWPR #Q038, September 2015

From the abstract:
According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the September employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 107,000 jobs and men gained 66,000 for a total of 173,000 jobs added in August. The overall unemployment rate decreased to 5.1 percent in August from 5.3 percent in July.

Beyond the Wage Stagnation Story: Better Measures Show America’s Workers Doing Better Than Previously Reported

Source: Stephen Rose, Urban Institute, August 2015

From the abstract:
Many major media outlets take as a given that the earnings of middle-class workers have not increased much for many years. The most commonly cited figure is the small 6 percent increase in median real hourly pay between 1979 and 2013. However, this paper finds that real median yearly compensation rose 38 percent over these years. This large discrepancy results from how data are examined in this paper: using yearly rather than hourly pay, including employer-provided benefits of payroll taxes and medical insurance and retirement contributions; and accounting for inflation with a different measure.

The State of the Unions 2015: A Profile of Organized Labor in New York City, New York State, and the United States

Source: Ruth Milkman, Stephanie Luce, Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies and the Center for Urban Research, CUNY, September 2015

From the press release:
New York City’s union rate has grown more than 16 percent since 2012, and about one in four New York City residents are union members — a percentage that is double the national average, a new study by scholars at the Murphy Institute and the Graduate Center shows. In the private sector, close to 18 percent of New York City residents are union members, nearly triple the national rate of six percent. Union rates among black city residents are particularly high: almost 40 percent of black workers in New York belong to a union, compared with 21 percent for white workers. … The gains in New York come as union membership is declining in most parts of the United States. …

Women in State Government, 2015

Source: Jennifer Horne, Council of State Governments, The Current State, Issue: 29, August 24, 2015

Women currently hold 79 statewide elected executive offices, representing 25.3 percent of the 312 available positions–a significant increase from 1971 when women held only 7 percent of such positions. It also represents a slight increase from 2013 and 2014 when women represented 23 percent of state elected offices.
Related:
Excel Version of the Table: “Women in State Government (August 2015)

The State of the Nation’s Housing 2015

Source: Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2015

From the press release:
The fledgling U.S. housing recovery lost momentum last year as homeownership rates continued to fall, single-family construction remained near historic lows, and existing home sales cooled, concludes The State of the Nation’s Housing report released today by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University. In contrast, rental markets continued to grow, fueled by another large increase in the number of renter households. However, with rents rising and incomes well below pre-recession levels, the U.S. is also seeing record numbers of cost-burdened renters, including more renter households higher up the income scale….Even before the Great Recession, the number of cost-burdened households (those paying more than 30 percent of income for housing) was on the rise. But while the cost-burdened share of homeowners began to recede in 2010 (because some homes were lost to foreclosure, and low interest rates helped other homeowners reduce their monthly costs), the cost-burdened share of renters has held near record highs. In 2013, almost half of all renters had housing cost burdens, including more than a quarter with severe burdens (paying more than 50 percent of income for housing). But perhaps most troubling, cost burdens are climbing the income ladder, affecting growing shares of not just low-income renters but moderate- and middle-income renters as well. The cost-burdened share of renters with incomes in the $30,000–45,000 range rose to 45 percent between 2003 and 2013, while one in five renters earning
$45,000–75,000 are now cost-burdened as well….
Related:
Key facts

Multiple jobholding in states in 2014

Source: Susan Campolongo, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review, August 2015

From the abstract:
Multiple-jobholding rates at the state and regional levels vary considerably from the national average. In 2014, the multiple-jobholding rate1 (the percentage of individuals who hold more than one job) in individual states varied considerably from the national average of 4.9 percent, a rate that has been unchanged since 2010. (See figure 1 and table 1.) In all, 22 states had multiple-jobholding rates significantly higher than the national average, 11 states had significantly lower rates, and 17 states and the District of Columbia had rates that were not significantly different from the U.S. average.