Category Archives: Statistics

Law Enforcement Officer Deaths Rose Sharply During First Six Months of 2007

Source: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and Concerns of Police Survivors, Research Report, July 2007

From the press release:
The number of law enforcement officers killed in the United States soared by 44 percent during the first six months of 2007, and for the first time in three decades, more than 100 officer deaths were recorded by the halfway point of the year, according to preliminary statistics from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) and Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS).

The groups’ preliminary data indicate 101 local, state and federal law enforcement officers were killed between January 1 and June 30, 2007, an increase from the 70 officers who lost their lives during the same period of 2006. The last time the mid-year total was that high was 1978, when there were 105 officer deaths. By year-end that year, 213 officers had been killed in the line of duty. In 2006, the year-end total was 145.

Of the 101 officers killed during the first half of 2007, 45 died in traffic-related incidents. That’s an increase of 36 percent from the 33 traffic-related fatalities during the first six months of 2006. This year’s figure includes 35 officers who died in automobile crashes, six who were struck by automobiles while outside their own vehicles and four who died in motorcycle crashes.

CRIME IN THE U.S. The Preliminary Stats for 2006

Source: Report issued by Robert S. Mueller III, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Justice, June 4, 2007

From the summary:
We’ve just released our preliminary crime statistics for 2006…and they’re available in full only here on this website. The big picture? Nationwide, violent crime in the U.S. increased 1.3 percent and property crime decreased 2.9 percent over 2005.

The stats, which we collected from more than 11,700 law enforcement agencies nationwide, show a rise in violent crime for the second straight year. The increase, however, is less than the 2.3 percent figure reported for 2005 and the 3.7 percent increase reflected in the preliminary six-month report for 2006 released in December.

Are Those Who Bring Work Home Really Working Longer Hours? Implications for BLS Productivity Measures

Source: Lucy P. Eldridge and Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Working Paper 406, May 2007

An ongoing debate surrounding BLS productivity data is that official labor productivity measures may be overstating productivity growth because of an increase in unmeasured hours worked outside the traditional workplace. This paper uses both the ATUS and May CPS Work Schedules and Work at Home Supplements to determine whether the number of hours worked by nonfarm business employees are underestimated and increasing over time due to unmeasured hours worked at home. We find that 8 – 9 percent of nonfarm business employees bring some work home from the workplace. In addition, those who bring work home report working longer hours than those who work exclusively in a workplace, resulting in a 0.8 – 1.1 percent understatement of measured hours worked. However, we find no conclusive evidence that productivity trends were biased over the 1997-2005 period due to work brought home from the workplace.

Census Bureau Announces Most Populous Cities

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, CB07-91
From the news release:
Phoenix has become the nation’s fifth most populous city, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates released today. As of July 1, 2006, this desert metropolis had a population of 1.5 million.

New York continued to be the nation’s most populous city, with 8.2 million residents. This was more than twice the population of Los Angeles, which ranked second at 3.8 million.

The estimates reveal that Phoenix moved into fifth place ahead of Philadelphia, the latest evidence of a decades-long population shift. Nearly a century ago, in 1910, each of the 10 most populous cities was within roughly 500 miles of the Canadian border. The 2006 estimates show that seven of the top 10 — and three of the top five — are in states that border Mexico.

Only three of the top 10 from 1910 remained on the list in 2006: New York, Chicago and Philadelphia. Conversely, three of the current top 10 cities (Phoenix; San Jose, Calif.; and San Diego) were not even among the 100 most populous in 1910, while three more (Dallas, Houston and San Antonio) had populations of less than 100,000.

The estimates also reveal that many of the nation’s fastest-growing cities are suburbs. North Las Vegas, Nev., a suburb of Las Vegas, had the nation’s fastest growth rate among large cities (100,000 or more population) between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2006. North Las Vegas’ population increased 11.9 percent during the period, to 197,567. It was joined on the list of the 10 fastest-growing cities by three in the Dallas metro area: McKinney (ranking second), Grand Prairie (sixth) and Denton (ninth). In the same vicinity, Fort Worth just missed the list, ranking 11th.

See Also: Table: Population Estimates for the 25 Largest U.S. Cities based on July 1, 2006 Population Estimates: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (PDF)
See Also: Table: Population Estimates for the 25 Fastest Growing U.S. Cities with Populations over 100,000 in 2006: July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006 (PDF)
See Also: Table: Population Estimates for the 25 U.S. Cities with the Largest Numerical Increase from July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006 (PDF)
See Also: Table: Population Estimates of the 25 Fastest Losing Cities: July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006 (PDF)
See Also: Fast Facts on Subcounty Population Estimates (PDF)
See Also: Detailed Tables
See Also: Methodology

2005 Nationwide Inpatient Sample Data Now Available

Source: Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), 2007

HCUPnet is a free, on-line system based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). It provides access to health statistics and information on hospital inpatient and emergency department utilization. It allows users to generate tables and graphs on national and regional statistics and trends for community hospitals in the U.S. In addition, community hospital data are available for those States that have agreed to participate in HCUPnet.

Explaining the Consumer Price Index

Source: Adam Weber and John Peterson, Economic and Budget Issue Brief, Congressional Budget Office, June 20, 2007

The consumer price index for all urban consumers (CPI-U) is the best-known official measure of inflation. Published monthly by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the CPI-U tries to approximate changes in the cost of living–that is, changes in the cost of maintaining a constant standard of living from one month to the next. To construct the CPI-U, BLS surveys the prices of thousands of goods and services (the index has more than 200 categories of items) in 38 regions, averaging the results to form a nationwide estimate of inflation. Over the past five years, the cost of living, as measured by the CPI-U, has varied but, on average, has risen by about 2-3/4 percent per year.

The purpose of this brief is to explain some of the methods used to construct the CPI-U and why, in some cases, the index’s estimates of inflation may differ from consumers’ perceptions of how much prices are rising.2 The brief focuses on six aspects of the CPI-U’s construction: averaging regional price indexes to create a nationwide index; estimating the expenditure weights that BLS assigns to the major categories of prices in the CPI-U to account for the categories’ relative importance; allowing for shifts in relative prices, a phenomenon known as economic substitution; adjusting for changes in the quality of various goods and services; measuring prices for medical care; and measuring prices for shelter.

The Condition of Education 2007

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, 2007

The Condition of Education 2007 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data and by presenting 48 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis on high school coursetaking. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2007 print edition includes 48 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.

New Chartbook Provides the Essentials of Medi-Cal

Source: California Health Care Foundation, May 2007

Summary
The main source of health insurance for one in six Californians, Medi-Cal is the nation’s largest Medicaid program covering 6.6 million people. Medi-Cal pays for nearly half of all births in the state, two-thirds of nursing home residents, and brings in more than $20 billion in federal funds to California’s health care providers.

The third edition of Medi-Cal Facts and Figures provides the essential elements of this massive program, including new information on enrollment, benefits and cost sharing, program spending and cost drivers. It also features key trends and comparisons with other states, describes the important role that Medi-Cal serves in California’s health care system, and examines several challenges facing the program.

Numbers and Types of Public Elementary and Secondary Education Agencies From the Common Core of Data: School Year 2005-06

Source: Lee Hoffman, National Center for Education Statistics, NCES 2007353, June 19, 2007

This report presents national and state-level data about the number of regular school districts and other local education agencies, school district size, grades served, and the number of school districts in city, suburban, town, and rural locales.
+ Full Report, U.S. Department of Education, NCES 2007-353

IRS Issues Spring 2007 Statistics of Income Bulletin

Source: Internal Revenue Service, IR-2007-119, June 18, 2007

The Internal Revenue Service today announced the release of the spring 2007 issue of the Statistics of Income Bulletin. Highlights include articles on high-income individual income tax returns, taxpayers reporting noncash contributions, farm proprietorship returns, qualified zone academy bonds, international boycott reports and S corporations.

The article on farm proprietorship returns is the first published by IRS in more than 20 years. In addition, this issue of the Bulletin presents selected tax year 1990-2004 individual income tax return data that have been indexed for inflation and tax year 2005 individual income tax return statistics classified by state and size of adjusted gross income.

For tax year 2004, there were 3,021,435 individual income tax returns filed with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $200,000 or more and 3,067,602 returns with expanded income of $200,000 or more.
Download in sections or as full document