Category Archives: Statistics

New ILO report says US leads the world in labour productivity, some regions are catching up, most lag behind

Source: International Labour Organization ILO/07/47, 02 September 2007
(download in sections)

From the press release:
While productivity levels have increased worldwide over the past decade, gaps remain wide between the industrialized region and most others, although South Asia, East Asia, and Central & South-Eastern Europe (non-European Union) & CIS have begun to catch up, the International Labour Office (ILO) said in a new report published today.

The ILO report, entitled “Key Indicators of the Labour Market (KILM), fifth Edition” indicates that the U.S. still leads the world by far in labour productivity per person employed in 2006 despite a rapid increase of productivity in East Asia where workers now produce twice as much as they did 10 years ago.

What’s more, the report also shows that the productivity gap between the US and most other developed economies continued to widen. The acceleration of productivity growth in the US has outpaced that of many other developed economies: With US$ 63,885 of value added per person employed in 2006, the United States was followed at a considerable distance by Ireland (US$ 55,986), Luxembourg (US$ 55,641), Belgium (US$ 55,235) and France (US$ 54,609).

However, Americans work more hours per year than workers in most other developed economies. This is why, measured as value added per hour worked, Norway has the highest labour productivity level (US$ 37.99), followed by the United States (US$ 35.63) and France (US$ 35.08).

Statistics of Income Bulletin — Summer 2007

Source: Internal Revenue Service, Vol. 27 no. 1, Summer 2007

From press release:
The Internal Revenue Service today announced the release of the summer 2007 issue of the Statistics of Income Bulletin, featuring data from 21.5 million individual income tax returns that reported non-farm sole proprietorship activity in tax year 2005.

Profits from all non-farm sole proprietorships totaled $269.9 billion in 2005, up 9 percent from tax year 2004. After adjusting for inflation, profits rose by 5.5 percent in 2005, which is the biggest year-to-year increase since a 7.2 percent gain in 1998.

All but one sole proprietor industrial sector saw an increase in profits in tax year 2005.

The real estate and rental leasing sector posted a 19.4 percent gain in profits, which was the biggest in percentage terms among the sector categories. Transportation and warehousing was second highest with a 15.5 percent profit gain. Retail trade was third with a 14.6 percent increase. (The sector-specific figures have not been adjusted for inflation.)

Wholesale trade (merchant wholesalers) was the only sole proprietor industrial sector to post a profit decline in tax year 2005 of 3.5 percent.

Monthly Labor Review: July/August 2007

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review, Vol. 130 nos. 7/8, July/August 2007
Categories: Income Inequality/Gap, Safety & Health, Statistics, Workforce

Articles include: Price highlights, 2006: energy goods retreat, moderating producer prices; Railroad-related work injury fatalities; Earnings by gender: evidence from Census 2000; Labor force status of families: a visual essay.

The 39th Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll Of the Public’s Attitudes Toward The Public Schools

Source: Lowell C. Rose and Alec M. Gallup, September 2007

The 39th poll comes at a time when K-12 schooling is near the top of the agenda in state and national policy discussions, and efforts to improve student achievement dominate those discussions. Chief among the improvement efforts is No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the sweeping federal initiative. Given the importance of this law and the fact that the poll was founded on the belief that public support is a vital component of shaping effective education policy, it is appropriate to open this report with the public’s reaction to NCLB and its principal strategy, standardized testing.

As it has grown in importance, the PDK/Gallup Poll has fueled debate regarding K-12 schooling, and charges of bias are routine. With that in mind, we have gradually reshaped the poll report to make it user-friendly and to draw the reader into the analysis of the data. We report the data, state what we believe they say, and leave it to the reader to reach his or her own conclusions.

In this year’s report, the statements following a table and designated as “Findings” are in the nature of summaries that we believe offer a fair interpretation of the data. Statements designated as “Conclusions” are highlighted because we think they capture the most significant of the poll results. These are offered as topics for debate. In the end, our aim is to let the data speak for themselves.

The PDK/Gallup polls provide a snapshot of the public’s assessment of its schools and the challenges they face, as well as a measure of what the public will and will not support in terms of program initiatives. Such information can be invaluable in the ongoing policy debates regarding our public schools. However, that information will not be remotely useful unless school leaders consider the implications of the public’s views for the operation of the schools. School leaders can bring to bear on school policy the common sense and practical wisdom that were missing from the creation of No Child Left Behind. Here, we offer seven implications of the 2007 PDK/Gallup Poll.

Fast Facts: Labor Day 2007

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, CB07-FF.13, July 9, 2007

Once again the U.S. Census with a treasure chest of fast facts. Here are a few:
The first observance of Labor Day is believed to have been a parade of 10,000 workers on Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City, organized by Peter J. McGuire, a Carpenters and Joiners Union secretary. By 1893, more than half the states were observing a “Labor Day” on one day or another, and Congress passed a bill to establish a federal holiday in 1894. President Grover Cleveland signed the bill soon afterward — designating the first Monday in September as Labor Day.
•Who Are We Celebrating?
152.8 million
Number of people 16 and older in the nation’s labor force in May 2007. In the nation’s labor force are 82.1 million men and 70.7 million women.
•Another Day, Another Dollar
$41,386 and $31,858
The 2005 annual median earnings for male and female full-time, year-round workers, respectively.
•Our Jobs
Top Three Occupations in the United States
Americans work in a wide variety of occupations. Here is a sampling:
Teachers – 6.8 million
Farmers and ranchers – 784,000
Hairdressers, hairstylists and cosmetologists – 767,000
•15.9 million
Number of commuters who leave for work between midnight and 5:59 a.m. These early birds represent 12 percent of all workers.
•3 million
Number of workers who face extreme commutes to work of 90 or more minutes each day.

Back to School Statistics

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, 2007

As the nation’s students and teachers return to school, here are selected statistics about American schools, students, and the educational process. The information was compiled by IES and derives from the Institute’s research and statistical centers. Follow the accompanying links for additional information.

More Than 300 Counties Now “Majority-Minority”

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, CB07-113, August 9, 2007

Nearly one in every 10 of the nation’s 3,141 counties has a population that is more than 50 percent minority. In 2006, eight counties that had not previously been majority-minority pushed the national total to 303, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today.

The two largest counties passing this threshold between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2006, are Denver County, Colo., and East Baton Rouge Parish, La., with total populations of 566,974 and 429,073, respectively. Three other counties were in Texas (Winkler, Waller and Wharton), with one each in Montana (Blaine), New Mexico (Colfax) and Virginia (Manassas Park, an independent city and considered a county equivalent).

Los Angeles County, Calif., had the largest minority population in the country in 2006. At 7 million, or 71 percent of its total, Los Angeles County is home to one in every 14 of the nation’s minority residents. The county’s minority population is higher than the total population of 38 states, with the largest population of Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians and Alaska Natives in the country. It also has the second largest population of blacks and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders.
+ Detailed tables

National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2006

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, USDL 07-1202, August, 9, 2007

There were 5,703 fatal work injuries in the United States in 2006, down slightly from the revised total of 5,734 fatalities in 2005. The rate of fatal work injuries in 2006 was 3.9 per 100,000 workers, down from a rate of 4.0 per 100,000 in 2005. The numbers reported in this release are preliminary and will be updated in April 2008.
Key findings of the 2006 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries:
• The overall fatal work injury rate for the U.S. in 2006 was lower than the rate for any year since the fatality census was first conducted in 1992.
• Coal mining industry fatalities more than doubled in 2006, due to the Sago Mine disaster and other multiple-fatality coal mining incidents.
• The number of workplace homicides in 2006 was a series low and reflected a decline of over 50 percent from the high reported in 1994.
• Fatalities among workers under 25 years of age fell 9 percent, and the rate of fatal injury among these workers was down significantly.
• The 937 fatal work injuries involving Hispanic or Latino workers in 2006 was a series high, but the overall fatality rate for Hispanic or Latino workers was lower than in 2005.
• Fatalities among self-employed workers declined 11 percent and reached a series low in 2006.
• Aircraft-related fatalities were up 44 percent, led by a number of multiple-fatality events including the August 2006 Comair crash.

World Prison Population List, Seventh Edition

Source: Roy Walmsley, International Centre for Prison Studies, Kings College London

Key Points:
● More than 9.25 million people are held in penal institutions throughout the world, mostly as pre-trial detainees (remand prisoners) or as sentenced prisoners. Almost half of these are in the United States (2.19m), China (1.55m plus pre- trial detainees and prisoners in ‘administrative detention’) or Russia (0.87m).
● The United States has the highest prison population rate in the world, some 738 per 100,000 of the national population, followed by Russia (611), St Kitts & Nevis (547), U.S. Virgin Is. (521), Turkmenistan (c.489), Belize (487), Cuba (c.487), Palau (478), British Virgin Is. (464), Bermuda (463), Bahamas (462), Cayman Is. (453), American Samoa (446), Belarus (426) and Dominica (419).
● However, more than three fifths of countries (61%) have rates below 150 per 100,000. (The rate in England and Wales – 148 per 100,000 of the national population – is above the mid-point in the World List.)
● Prison population rates vary considerably between different regions of the world, and between different parts of the same continent.
See also:
The International Centre for Prison Studies
A Human Rights Approach to Prison Management
World Female Prison Population List 2006