Category Archives: Statistics

Cities Hit Hardest by Extreme Poverty

Source: Samuel Stebbins, 24/7 Wall St., April 17, 2018

From the summary:
….Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 24/7 Wall St. compared the percentage point change in concentrated poverty rates in U.S. metro areas between 2010 and 2016 to identify the cities where concentrated poverty is increasing most. The cities on this list span the United States geographically, from the West Coast to the East and from the South to the Midwest…..

Quarterly Summary of State and Local Government Tax Revenues: 4th Quarter 2017

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, G17-QTAX4, March 20, 2018

The summary provides quarterly estimates of state and local government tax revenue at a national level, as well as detailed tax revenue data for individual states. This report produces three tables: Tables 1 and 2 include income and sales data and Table 3 provides tax collections by state.

Fourth quarter 2017 tax revenues for the four largest state and local government tax categories increased 9.5 percent to $438.8 billion, from $400.8 billion in the same quarter of 2016.

Related:
Complete data sets

America’s Electoral Future: Demographic Shifts and the Future of the Trump Coalition

Source: Rob Griffin, Ruy Teixeira, and William H. Frey, Center for American Progress, April 14, 2018

From the introduction:
The recent elections of Donald Trump and Barack Obama were influenced in no small measure by shifts in the nation’s underlying demographic structure—the rise of communities of color, the increase in the number of older Americans, the sharpening of education divisions—and the distinctive voting behavior of these demographic groups. This 2018 report of the States of Change project, the fourth in an annual series, examines an array of future presidential election outcome scenarios—from 2020 through 2036—that could arise as the demography of the nation and its 50 states changes over the next 18 years.

These scenarios, developed by the authors, include outcomes that favor both Republican and Democratic candidates. They are not intended as predictions but are simulations based on assumptions about different demographic groups’ future voting patterns. Each of the alternative scenarios assumes the same projections for the nation’s underlying demographic structure of eligible voters (EVs) with respect to race, age, and education attainment. As such, the scenarios provide for a more in-depth understanding than national or state polling trends can supply about how emerging voting patterns may interact with changes in the demography of the nation’s electorate to affect future popular vote and Electoral College outcomes…..

Hawaii’s Working Population: An Analysis by Industry 2012-2016

Source: Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism Research and Economic Analysis Division, April 2018

From the press release:
The Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) released a report today, “Hawaii’s Working Population: An Analysis by Industry 2012-2016,” which shows the general demographic, social, and economic characteristics of Hawaii working population by industry.

“The report shows the structure of our industry from the employment perspective. The top two industries, Accommodation and Food Services and Retail Trade, are closely related to tourism and employed one fourth of our total working population,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria. “It is encouraging that Hawaii employees in the Accommodation and Food Services sector were paid better than their counterparts in the nation.”

Hawaii’s average labor earnings and wages, in general, are lower than the U.S. average. Females made less income than males in almost all the industries. “The analysis in this report may be helpful for those planning to enter the labor market,” said Chief State Economist Dr. Eugene Tian “However, most of the statistics are averages for the industry combining all the occupations. We are working on another analysis looking at the characteristics of Hawaii’s working population by occupation.”….

Related:
PRICED OUT OF PARADISE
Source: Hawaii News Now, 2018
With our ongoing series, “Priced out of Paradise,” Hawaii News Now is exploring Hawaii’s high cost of living and why so many island families are struggling to make ends meet. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #HICostofLiving.

Report: In Honolulu, $40K salary now considered ‘very low income’
Source: Mileka Lincoln, Hawaii News Now, April 23, 2018

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has released its income limits for 2018 — a calculation that is used to determine who can qualify for affordable and subsidized housing programs, and also helps establish fair market rent. HUD income limits in Hawaii are increasing substantially — in some cases by more than 10 percent — as the cost of living jumps each year. This means more people are qualifying for public assistance through housing vouchers or Section 8 placement, but those options are still as limited as before. According to HUD, as of 2018, low income for a single person in Honolulu is someone making up to $65,350. Just a year ago, it was $58,600. That’s a nearly $7,000 increase from 2017.

10 Things You Should Know on Tax Day

Source: Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP), April 13, 2018

Everyone pays taxes, including those who earn the least. Our collective federal, state, and local tax system includes income taxes, payroll taxes (Social Security, Medicare), property taxes, sales and other excise taxes. The total share of taxes (federal, state, and local) that Americans across the economic spectrum will pay in 2018 is roughly equal to their total share of income.

Institute of Politics Spring 2018 Youth Poll

Source: Harvard Kennedy School, Institute of Politics, Spring 2018

Spring 2018 marks the 35th National Youth Poll conducted by the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School examining the political opinions and civic engagement of young Americans ages 18 to 29. Since its conception by two Harvard undergraduate students in 2000, the Harvard Public Opinion Project has provided the most comprehensive look at the political opinions, voting trends, and views on public service held by young Americans. Beginning on April 10th, 2018 and continuing through the month of April, the IOP will release results from specific portions of the poll.

A new national poll of America’s 18- to 29-year-olds by Harvard’s Institute of Politics (IOP), located at the Kennedy School of Government, finds that nearly two-thirds (64%) of young Americans have more fear than hope about the future of democracy in America.  

For the first time, the Harvard Public Opinion Project asked a series of questions about how responsible 18- to 29-year-olds believed different groups were for the existing problems in American politics and society today. Politicians were viewed as very or somewhat responsible by at least 7-in-10 young Americans, regardless of political affiliation. Money in politics and the media were mentioned by at least 6-in-10 Democrats, Republicans and Independents.

– Young Democrats under 30 blamed politicians (77% responsible), Donald Trump (77% responsible), money in politics (75% responsible), structural racism (69% responsible) and lack of access to higher education (66% responsible) as the most significant factors responsible for the state of politics and society today.

– The top five factors Republicans believe are responsible are: the media (72%), politicians (70% responsible), political correctness (64% responsible), money in politics (63% responsible), with other Americans (45%), a distant fifth.

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2017 and by Race and Ethnicity

Source: Ariane Hegewisch, M.Phil., Emma Williams-Baron, Institute for Women’s Policy Research, Fact Sheet, IWPR# C467, April 2018

From the summary:
Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 121 occupations. The occupation with the largest gender wage gap is ‘personal financial advisor;’ in 2017, the median weekly earnings of women ‘personal financial advisors’ were only 58.9 percent of those of men’s, corresponding to a gender wage gap of 41.1 percent….

Medians – Solid financial metrics, ability to raise rates underpin stable sector

Source: Evan W Hess, Matt Jaffe, Lauren Von Bargen, Leonard Jones, Alexandra S. Parker, Moody’s, Sector Comment, Water and sewer utilities – US, April 5, 2018
(subscription required)

Municipal water and sewer utilities continue to demonstrate a stable to modestly positive financial performance, according our latest medians data. The steady performance is primarily driven by utility systems’ willingness and ability to raise rates to support operations and debt service. However, declining asset condition across the sector indicates an underinvestment in infrastructure. These credit factors, which are key to our stable outlook for the sector, are set to continue….

Rating changes for the 50 states from 1970

Source: Emily Raimes, Nicholas Samuels, Kenneth Kurtz, Ted Hampton, Baye Larsen, Marcia Van Wagner, Genevieve Nolan, Matthew Butler, Pisei Chea, Timothy Blake, Moody’s, Sector Comment, State government – US, April 6, 2018
(subscription required)

This report is part of a series that identifies changes in state general obligation (GO) and issuer ratings and outlooks. The report is produced on a quarterly basis with the last publication in January 2018. We maintain GO or equivalent issuer ratings for 49 states. Stable outlooks apply to 43 states, and six states have negative outlooks. The data included in this report reflect rating changes for each state by year, a list of all state GO or issuer ratings by category, and a list of all state outlooks.

State Higher Education Finance (SHEF) Fiscal Year 2017

Source: State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2018

From the press release:
In FY
201 7, for the first time in our nation’s history, more than half of all states relied more heavily on tuition dollars to fund their public systems of higher education than on government appropriations, despite increased state and local support for public colleges and universities. That’s the overarching narrative of the State Higher Education Finance (SHEF) FY 2017 report, a comprehensive, nonpartisan analysis of educational appropriations, tuition revenue and enrollment trends in all 50 states, released today by the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association (SHEEO).

In FY 2017, states saw a moderate increase in state and local support for higher education, along with a slight increase in tuition revenue and nearly no change in full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment. Yet despite five straight years of increases in public investments, constant dollar state support of higher education per FTE student remains $1,000 lower than before the 2008 Great Recession and $2,000 lower than before the 2001 dot-com crash. What’s more, states are increasingly dependent on tuition revenue as a major funding source for public colleges and universities, which could pose significant sustainability challenges as states continue their efforts to increase the percentage of their residents with some education beyond high school to meet their workforce needs. ….

….Five key takeaways from this year’s report include:
1. Overall, states moderately expanded their support for higher education in FY 2017. ….
2. State financial aid for students attending public institutions reached an all-time high. ….
3. For the first time, more than half of all states relied more on tuition than on government appropriations to finance their systems of higher education. ….
4. Total educational revenues are at the highest level since 1980. ….
5. Full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment continues to taper, though not significantly. ….

Related:
Interactive data
Full Unadjusted Dataset – Excel
Appropriations, Tuition, and Enrollment, by State – Excel
Changes since Great Recession, by State – Excel
Figures and Tables