Category Archives: Politics

Supreme Court vacancy, 2017: An overview

Source: Ballotpedia, 2017

On January 31, 2017, President Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch to succeed Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court. Scalia was a member of the U.S. Supreme Court for three decades. If confirmed, Gorsuch would be the seventh justice to have once clerked at the Supreme Court, but the first to serve on the court with the justice with whom he clerked. He clerked for Justice Byron White, who was the first Supreme Court clerk to serve as a justice, and for Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is the senior associate justice on the court. ….

Confirmation hearings on Gorsuch’s nomination before the Senate Judiciary Committee began on March 20, 2017.

On March 16, 2016, President Barack Obama nominated the chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, Merrick Garland, to the Supreme Court, but the U.S. Senate took no action on the nomination, returning Garland’s nomination to the president at the sine die adjournment of the 114th Congress on January 3, 2017. The 294-day period set a record for the longest interval from nomination to Senate action for any Supreme Court nominee, besting the 125-day interval attending Justice Louis Brandeis’ nomination in 1916.

Page contents:
Timeline
The announcement
Major players in Gorsuch’s nomination
See also
Footnotes

Related:
Potential nominee profile: Neil Gorsuch
Source: Eric Citron, SCOTUSblog, January 13, 2017

Does Neil Gorsuch Believe in Liberty and Equality for All?
Source: David Gans, New Republic, March 20, 2017
The judge’s selective approach to constitutional originalism raises serious questions about his respect for the Second Founding after the Civil War.

Former Law Student: Gorsuch Told Class Women ‘Manipulate’ Maternal Leave
Source: Arnie Seipel, Nina Totenberg, NPR, March 20, 2017

Neil Gorsuch Has Web of Ties to Secretive Billionaire
Source: Charlie Savage, Julie Turkewitz, New York Times, March 14, 2017

The Lies of Originalism
Source: Matt McManus, Jacobin, March 20, 2017
Neil Gorsuch’s originalist philosophy isn’t uniquely unbiased or respectful of democracy. It’s a handmaiden of American reaction.

Judge Gorsuch and Johnson Resentencing (This is Not a Joke)
Source: Leah M. Litman, University of California, Irvine School of Law, UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2017-07, January 22, 2017
This paper describes an opinion by Judge Gorsuch that addresses when federal criminal defendants may file petitions for habeas corpus to challenge their convictions or sentences.

Facebook’s new ‘Town Hall’ feature helps you find and contact your government reps

Source: Sarah Perez, TechCrunch, March 14, 2017

In Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s nearly 6,000-word manifesto published last month, he laid out a number of global ambitions he had for the social network in the days ahead — including one where its users became more “civically-engaged” and voted more often. Now it seems Facebook has taken its first steps toward making that possible, through a new feature it’s calling “Town Hall.”

This latest addition has just popped up on the “More” menu in Facebook’s mobile app, and offers a simple way for users to find and connect with their government representatives on a local, state and federal level…..

The Paradox of Community Power: Cultural Processes and Elite Authority in Participatory Governance

Source: Jeremy R. Levine, Social Forces, Vol. 95 no. 3, March 2017
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
From town halls to public forums, disadvantaged neighborhoods appear more “participatory” than ever. Yet increased participation has not necessarily resulted in increased influence. This article, drawing on a four-year ethnographic study of redevelopment politics in Boston, presents an explanation for the decoupling of participation from the promise of democratic decision-making. I find that poor urban residents gain the appearance of power and status by invoking and policing membership in “the community”—a boundary sometimes, though not always, implicitly defined by race. But this appearance of power is largely an illusion. In public meetings, government officials can reinforce their authority and disempower residents by exploiting the fact that the boundary demarcating “the community” lacks a standardized definition. When officials laud “the community” as an abstract ideal rather than a specific group of people, they reduce “the community process” to a bureaucratic procedure. Residents appear empowered, while officials retain ultimate decision-making authority. I use the tools of cultural sociology to make sense of these findings and conclude with implications for the study of participatory governance and urban inequality.

The Role of Constituency, Party, and Industry in Pennsylvania’s Act 13

Source: Bradford H. Bishop, Mark R. Dudley, State Politics & Policy Quarterly, OnlineFirst, First Published December 1, 2016
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
While a large body of research exists regarding the role of industry money on roll-call voting in the U.S. Congress, there is surprisingly little scholarship pertaining to industry influence on state politics. This study fills this void in an analysis of campaign donations and voting during passage of Act 13 in Pennsylvania during 2011 and 2012. After collecting information about natural gas production in state legislative districts, we estimate a series of multivariate models aimed at uncovering whether campaign donations contributed to a more favorable policy outcome for industry. Our findings indicate that campaign donations played a small but systematic role in consideration of the controversial legislation, which represented one of the first and most important state-level regulatory reforms for the hydraulic fracturing industry.

Fight Trump. Work From Home.

Source: Tasneem Rajamar, Mother Jones, April 2017

Remote jobs are great for work-life balance—and democracy. ….. By 2020, Dell hopes that half its workforce will be doing at least some remote work. A report released by the company in June 2016 found that thanks to telecommuting, 35,000 US employees each saved the equivalent of one metric ton of carbon dioxide on average every year—even when you consider the extra energy required for heat and lights in a home office….. What’s more, a group of researchers found that for low-income people, the longer their commute is, the less likely they are to vote. And another study shows that no other daily activity brings out as many negative emotions as the morning commute—not dealing with the kids, cleaning the dishes, or even being at work. When you’re already stressed out and annoyed, finding the energy to engage politically is just that much harder…..
Related:
The Sustainability Benefits of the Connected Workplace
Source: John Pflueger, Sarah Gibson, Christian Normand, Dell, June 2016

The “Daily Grind” – Work, Commuting, and Their Impact on Political Participation
Source: Benjamin J. Newman, Joshua Johnson, Patrick L. Lown, American Politics Research, Vol 42, Issue 1, 2014
(subscription required)

Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being
Source: Daniel Kahneman and Alan B. Krueger, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Volume 20, Number 1, Winter 2006