Category Archives: Mental Health

The Short-Lived Benefits Of Abusive Supervisory Behavior For Actors: An Investigation Of Recovery And Work Engagement

Source: Xin Qin, Mingpeng Huang, Russell Johnson, Qiongjing Hu and Dong Ju, Academy of Management Journal, Published online before print September 11, 2017
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Although empirical evidence has accumulated showing that abusive supervision has devastating effects on subordinates’ work attitudes and outcomes, knowledge about how such behavior impacts supervisors who exhibit it is limited. Drawing upon conservation of resources theory, we develop and test a model that specifies how and when engaging in abusive supervisory behavior has immediate benefits for supervisors. Via two experiments and a multi-wave diary study across 10 consecutive workdays, we found that engaging in abusive supervisory behavior was associated with improved recovery level. Moreover, abusive supervisory behavior had a positive indirect effect on work engagement through recovery level. Interestingly, supplemental analyses suggested that these beneficial effects were short-lived because, over longer periods of time (i.e., one week and beyond), abusive supervisory behavior were negatively related to supervisors’ recovery level and engagement. The strength of these short-lived beneficial effects was also bound by personal and contextual factors. Empathic concern–a personal factor–and job demands–a contextual factor–moderated the observed effects. Specifically, supervisors with high empathic concern or low job demands experienced fewer benefits after engaging in abusive supervisory behavior. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings, and propose future research directions.

Related:
Being a jerk at work doesn’t pay off for long
Source: Andy Henion, Futurity, September 28th, 2017

Congressional Primer on Responding to Major Disasters and Emergencies

Source: Jared T. Brown, Bruce R. Lindsay, Jaclyn Petruzzell, Congressional Research Service, CRS Report, R41981, September 8, 2017

While the disaster response and recovery process is fundamentally a relationship between the federal government and the requesting state or tribal government, there are roles for congressional offices. For instance, congressional offices may help provide information to survivors on available federal and nonfederal assistance, oversee the coordination of federal efforts in their respective states and districts, and consider legislation to supplemental disaster assistance or authorities. Congressional offices also serve as a valuable source of accurate and timely information to their constituents on response and relief efforts….

….Before and after a disaster strikes, it is useful to understand the basic national emergency management structure and where authority rests at various stages of the process. This report provides information to aid policymakers as they navigate the many levels of responsibility, and numerous policy pressure points; it describes the laws and administrative policies governing the disaster response and recovery process. The report also reviews the legislative framework that exists for providing federal financial assistance following disasters, as well as the policies the executive branch employs to provide supplemental help to state, tribal, and local governments during time of disasters…..

Related:
Congressional Considerations Related to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma
Source: Jared T. Brown, Congressional Research Service, CRS Insight, IN10763, September 8, 2017

This Insight provides a short overview of issues Congress may consider in relation to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. It is not intended to provide up-to-date information on unfolding events. For storm-related updates and the current status of response efforts, see official government sources (e.g., Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and National Weather Service), congressional advisories from government sources, and/or news media. For additional support, please contact available CRS experts in disaster-related issue areas….

The mental health impact of major disasters like Harvey and Irma
Source: J. Brian Houston, Jennifer First, The Conversation, September 11, 2017

What do hospitals do in a hurricane? Use their own emergency plans
Source: Daniel B. Hess, The Conversation, September 11, 2017

Where have all the workers gone? An inquiry into the decline of the U.S. labor force participation rate

Source: Alan B. Krueger, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity (BPEA), BPEA Conference Drafts, August 26, 2017

From the summary:
The increase in opioid prescriptions from 1999 to 2015 could account for about 20 percent of the observed decline in men’s labor force participation (LFP) during that same period.

In “Where have all the workers gone? An inquiry into the decline of the U.S. labor force participation rate” (PDF), Princeton University’s Alan Krueger examines the labor force implications of the opioid epidemic on a local and national level.

Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of ‘Sober Homes’

Source: Greg Allen, NPR, Morning Edition, August 10, 2017

Some local and state officials in South Florida are calling for more regulation of addiction recovery residences to help combat insurance scams.
Related:
Sober Homes Task Force Report 2017
Source: Palm Beach County, Sober Homes Task Force Report, January 1, 2017

Grand Jury Report
Source: State Attorney for the 15th Judicial Circuit, Palm Beach County, December 8, 2016

Delray Beach Principles to Guide Zoning for Community Residences for People with Disabilities
Source: Daniel Lauber, prepared for the City of Delray Beach Florida, May 2017

Taking Care of the Mentally Ill

Source: B.L. Sloan, D.E. Efeti, Corrections Today, Vol. 79 no. 3, May/June 2017
(subscription required)

A training opportunity for correctional professionals. …. Across the nation, individuals with a serious mental illness are three times more likely to be incarcerated than placed in a mental health facility. … Because of this ever-growing population, the challenges facing correctional staff regarding custody, supervision and treatment of mentally ill offenders have never been greater. Therefore, it is not only necessary for the treatment staff to address then needs of the mentally ill offender, but it is critical for security staff members to understand and recognize problems faced by this special population and be better equipped to manage it. ….

Costs and Outcomes of Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders in the US

Source: Rabah Kamal, Cynthia Cox, David Rousseau, et al for the Kaiser Family Foundation, JAMA Infographic, Visualizing Health Policy, August 1, 2017

This Visualizing Health Policy infographic looks at costs and outcomes of mental health and substance use disorders in the United States (US). Nearly 18% of adults reported having a mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder in 2015, including more than 1 in 5 women. Furthermore, nearly 3% of people aged 12 years or older reported addiction to or misuse of an illicit drug in 2015, including more than 7% of people aged 18 to 25 years. However, 1 in 5 people say they or a family member had to forego needed mental health services because they couldn’t afford the cost, their insurance wouldn’t cover it, they were afraid or embarrassed, or they didn’t know where to go. Mental illness treatment accounted for $89 billion, or 5%, of total medical services spending in 2013, behind checkups/prevention and circulatory disorders. Mental health and substance use disorders together were the leading cause of disease burden in 2015, surpassing cancer and cardiovascular disease, among others. Relative to countries of similar size and wealth, the US has had higher rates of death from unintentional poisonings, the majority of which were due to drug overdoses. In 2013 the age-standardized rate of death from unintentional poisonings per 100 000 population was 12.4 in the US compared with 2.5 on average in comparable countries.

Costs and Outcomes of Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders in the US

How killing the ACA could lead to more opioid deaths in West Virginia and other Trump states

Source: Simon Haeder, The Conversation, July 24, 2017

…. While the exact nature of Republican repeal-and-replace efforts remains unclear at this moment, all proposals made public so far would pose enormous challenges for states like West Virginia to turn the tide on the devastating opioid epidemic.

One of the most essential tools in fighting the epidemic, the expansion of Medicaid, would be rolled back either immediately or over several years. Furthermore, the entire Medicaid program, the backbone of states’ efforts to provide treatment and services for opioid addiction treatment, would be further curtailed by per capita caps.

Moreover, all proposals would either outright eliminate or allow states to waive the crucial Essential Health Benefit provisions. These provisions require insurers to provide coverage for certain specified conditions, such as pregnancy, addiction treatment and emergency room care, that they might otherwise refuse to cover because of their costs.

Under certain proposals, lifetime and annual limits could also affect those covered by employer-provided insurance to lose access to crucial treatment options. ….

Mental Disorders Among Criminal Offenders: A Review of the Literature

Source: Emily D. Gottfried, Sheresa C. Christopher, Journal of Correctional Health Care, Vol. 23 Issue 3, July 2017
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
This article examines mental illness among adult, juvenile, male, female, jail, and prison inmates. It also explores the way in which mental health diagnoses impact offending and violent behavior. A review of literature pertaining to differences between the genders and age of offenders suggests that psychiatric disorders are more common among criminal offenders than the population at large. Furthermore, it appears that many mentally ill offenders do not receive sufficient treatment during their incarcerations and that barriers inherent to incarceration prevent adequate treatment of mental illnesses.

‘Giving Help and Not Asking for It’: Inside the Mental Health of First Responders

Source: Katherine Barrett & Richard Greene, Governing, July 7, 2017

Teaching cops, firefighters and prison workers to recognize and know how to handle people with mental illness is a big part of the efforts to reduce suffering and death at the hands of law enforcement. Less talked about is the mental health of the cops, firefighters and prison workers themselves. ….