Category Archives: Libraries & Museums

2008 Kids & Family Reading Report

Source: Scholastic, June 2008

A new study released today finds that 75% of kids age 5-17 agree with the statement, “No matter what I can do online, I’ll always want to read books printed on paper,” and 62% of kids surveyed say they prefer to read books printed on paper rather than on a computer or a handheld device. The Kids & Family Reading Report, a national survey of children age 5-17 and their parents, also found that kids who go online to extend the reading experience – by going to book or author websites or connecting with other readers – are more likely to read books for fun every day.
See also:
Press release
2006 report
To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence

Public Libraries in the United States: Fiscal Year 2005

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

This report includes national and state summary data on public libraries in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, with an introduction, selected findings, and several tables. The report, based on data from the Public Libraries Survey for fiscal year 2005, includes information on population of legal service area, service outlets, library collections and services, full-time equivalent staff, and operating revenue and expenditures. The report includes several key findings: Nationwide, visits to public libraries totaled 1.4 billion, or 4.7 library visits per capita. The average number of Internet terminals available for public use per stationary outlet was 11.2.

Full Report (PDF; 608 KB)

Librarian Salary Survey Reports Median Librarian Salary Up 2.8 Percent To $57,809 In 2007; Non-MLS Position Salaries Also Reported

Source: American Library Association, press release, August 28, 2007

Analysis of data from more than 800 public and academic libraries showed the mean salary for librarians with ALA-accredited Master’s Degrees increased 2.8 percent from 2006, up $1,550 to $57,809. The median ALA MLS salary was $53,000. Salaries ranged from $22,048 to $225,000.

For the first time the non-MLS salary survey data, including 62 non-MLS positions, reported salaries for staff employed as librarians but who do not have ALA-accredited Master’s Degrees in Library Science. Non-MLS salaries ranged $10,712 to $143,700. Both printed surveys also indicate the minimal educational requirement for each position.
See also: ALA-APA Rural Library Staff Salary Survey

New Study: The Impressive Return on Investment (ROI) of Pennsylvania Public Libraries

Source: Resource Shelf, June 12, 2007 at 12:59 am

From the announcement:
Librarians have been saying for years that public libraries are a bargain. Now they’ve got the numbers to prove it. According to a study conducted by the University of North Carolina’s School of Information and Library Science, Pennsylvania taxpayers receive a return of $5.50 for every $1 they invest in public libraries in Pennsylvania. That means a return of $55 for every $10 of local, state and federal taxes we invest in supporting our public libraries… The Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) is collaborating with Pennsylvania’s Office of Commonwealth Libraries, which commissioned the study, to spread the word about the results. This study is part of a state-by-state national project.
Direct to Full Text of Report: Taxpayer Return-on-Investment (ROI) in Pennsylvania Public Libraries

Making Cities Stronger: Public Library Contributions to Local Economic Development

Source: Carlos A. Manjarrez and Jessica Cigna, Urban Institute, Urban Libraries Council, January 2007

The Urban Libraries Council commissioned this study to look at how public libraries contribute to the human dimension of economic development. In the process, researchers also uncovered more evidence of the important contributions public libraries make to strengthening places and community quality of life.

This report indicates that public libraries today are deeply involved with people, technology, and quality of life. Public libraries have tremendous reach geographically and virtually. Within the U.S. there are over 9,000 public libraries providing services in over 16,000 branch facilities and through the Web. Nearly every one of these locally-funded organizations offers collections and programs that support early literacy, workforce readiness and small businesses. As such, they are an important and dynamic part of the community’s learning infrastructure which supports local economic development.

This study finds that the return on investment in public libraries not only benefits individuals, but also strengthens community capacity to address urgent issues related to economic development. Public libraries are increasingly finding their “fit” in the formal and informal network of agencies, corporations, nonprofits, and community organizations working together to elevate levels of education and economic potential, making cities stronger.

Libraries Key to Building Local Economic Base

Source: PA Times, Vol. 30 no. 3, March 2007
(subscription required)

Evanston, IL-Public libraries build a community’s capacity for economic activity and resiliency, says a new study from the “Urban Institute. Making Cities Stronger: Public Library Contributions to Local Economic Development” adds to the body of research pointing to a shift in the role of public libraries-from a passive, recreational reading and research institution to an active economic development agent, addressing such pressing urban issues as literacy, workforce training, small business vitality and community quality of life. The study was commissioned by the Urban Libraries Council (ULC) and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.