Category Archives: Libraries & Museums

Unions 101: What library unions do—and don’t do—for workers

Source: Carrie Smith, American Libraries, Vol. 49 nos. 11/12, November/December 2018

….According to a report from the AFL-CIO’s Department for Professional Employees, in 2017 union librarians and library assistants earned on average 31% more per week than their nonunion equivalents. Union library workers are also more likely to have health coverage, retirement plans, and sick leave, the report states.

Yet library unions are as diverse as libraries themselves. Public library workers may be organized in a library-specific union that represents librarians and other staff, or they may be a part of a larger municipal union that represents city or county workers. Academic librarians can find themselves part of a larger faculty union or librarians-only bargaining unit, while school librarians are often members of the local teachers union. Most unions don’t include members in supervisory positions.

The landscape is complex, and it’s difficult to paint a picture of library unionism with one brush, but there are commonalities workers should know…..

Navigating Law Librarianship While Black: A Week in the Life of a Black Female Law Librarian

Source: Shamika D. Dalton, Gail Mathapo, and Endia Sowers-Paige, Law Library Journal, Vol. 110 no. 3, 2018
(subscription required)

The ideal work environment provides a sense of purpose and validation. Inevitably, however, unconscious or implicit biases permeate the workplace because we all have them. These biases can be based on race, age, gender, religion, socioeconomic status, physical disability, and other characteristics. Implicit bias in the workplace can “stymie diversity, recruiting and retention efforts, and unknowingly shape an organization’s culture.” People of color, in particular, experience challenges as a result of racial microaggressions in the workplace.

Racial microaggressions are “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.” Racial microaggressions may not raise an eyebrow right away, but they are harmful to the work environment. Due to their subtle nature, racial microaggressions can be “difficult to identify, quantify, and rectify.” For this reason,
Derald Wing Sue and colleagues identified three forms of racial microaggressions: microassaults, microinsults, and microinvalidations. …. For women of color, these effects are amplified as they have to endure both racial and gender microaggressions in the workplace. ….

The 21st Century Library

Source: James Bikales, Harvard Political Review, October 8, 2018

….While the American foray into the digital age would lead many to classify libraries as obsolete, the continued — if not heightened — importance of the library’s core mission to provide knowledge, as well as new skills of librarians and changes to the design of libraries, make them relevant in our changed world. Their continued evolution will be essential to the future of scholarship and citizenship….

“Could My Dark Hands Break through the Dark Shadow?”: Gender, Jim Crow, and Librarianship during the Long Freedom Struggle, 1935–1955

Source: Alex H. Poole, The Library Quarterly, Vol. 88 no. 4, October 2018
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
This article illuminates the role of southern African American female librarians during the long civil rights movement (1930s through 1960s). Black women faced the “double jeopardy” of race and gender, but college-educated, “Female Talented Tenth” members such as Mollie Huston Lee and other North Carolina librarians committed to personal and community uplift. Institutions such as the North Carolina Negro Library Association (1935–55) and the Richard B. Harrison Library (established in 1935) were incubators of innovative resistance strategies to white racism and were crucial in setting the stage for direct action in the 1960s.

An Overdue Discussion: Two takes on the library-fine debate

Source: Phil Morehart, American Libraries, June 1, 2018

Whether to charge fines for overdue materials is a hot-button topic. The issues are many: Some libraries have halted the practice, citing concerns that fines keep patrons away, while other libraries have kept them in place as vital revenue streams. Fines are also used by some libraries as a method to teach personal responsibility, while other libraries consider that lesson outside the realm of librarianship. We spoke with a librarian on each side of the debate….

The Librarian’s Guide to Homelessness: Advice for managers and leaders

Source: Ryan J. Dowd, American Libraries, June 1, 2018

….Working with difficult homeless individuals is hard. Managing people who work with difficult homeless individuals is harder. There are two equally challenging problems:
– staff members who are terrified of conflict and avoid all confrontation by not enforcing any rules
– staff members who think they are Rambo, turning every mild conflict into World War III

It is easier to help a timid staff member become assertive than it is to help an aggressive staff member be polite. I am not sure why this is, but hot-headed employees usually cannot rein it in for very long. They can get better for a little while, but eventually emotions take over and they lose their cool. Timid staff, on the other hand, grow only more confident as they get experience.

There are some tactics that can make you more effective…..

Why the Janus Decision Matters to Library Unions

Source: Carrie Smith, American Libraries, July 24, 2018

On June 27, the Supreme Court delivered a blow to public sector unions that could affect many library workers. The 5–4 decision in Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) declares it unconstitutional for public sector unions to collect agency fees from nonmember employees based on free speech grounds.

Library workers in public, school, academic, and other libraries who are employed through state and local governments in the 22 states that are not already right-to-work states are affected by this decision. Those who are not union members will no longer have agency fees deducted from their paychecks. More than a quarter of librarians (26.2%) and around one-fifth of library technicians (19.3%) and library assistants (22.7%) are union members nationwide, according to statistics compiled by the AFL-CIO Department for Professional Employees…..

Public Libraries in the United States: Fiscal Year 2015

Source: Institute of Museum and Library Services, July 2018

From the press release:
The Public Libraries Survey report, released today by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, provides a snapshot of public library use, financial health, staffing, and resources in FY 2015. IMLS also released a set of state profile reports, for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Each year since 1988, the Public Libraries of the United States Survey has provided a national census of America’s public libraries. The data are collected from approximately 9,000 public library systems comprised of over 17,000 individual main libraries, library branches, and bookmobiles in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. ….

The 2015 report includes the following findings:
– Nearly 311 million Americans lived within a public library service area in 2015, an increase from 306 million in 2014.
– In 2015, there were 1.39 billion visits to public libraries, or 4.48 visits per person.
– Public libraries offered 4.7 million programs in 2015, attended by nearly 107 million people, 5 million more attendees than the previous year.
– Public libraries made 1.31 billion collection items available to patrons and provided access to over a quarter million internet computers.
– The number of electronic materials available through public libraries, including audio, video and e-books, continued to grow. E-books, especially, have seen significant growth, increasing from 0.04 e-book per person in 2006 to just over one e-book per person in 2015. ….

The Return-On-Investment from Your Public Library is Unbelievable!

Source: Oleg Kagan, EveryLibrary, July 17, 2018

If libraries were a business, you’d want to buy that stock.

Wise investors know a good deal when they see it, which is why so many people who are smart and rich love their public library. It’s simple, really, if you consider what the average U.S. household pays for library services (~$7.50/month) and put that next to a public library’s vast offerings, the point is obvious. For under ten dollars you get thousands of books, music, movies, wholesome activities for kids, very expensive market research databases, and a much, much more. But say you’re still not convinced that libraries are a smart investment. Okay, what if I tell you that over and over again research has shown that the Return-on-Investment (ROI) for your local library is around $5 (but could be up to $9), for every dollar spent. It’s true: for every dollar that communities invest in library services they get five back!….

Related:
Should We Replace Libraries with Amazon?
Source: EveryLibrary, July 22, 2018

Of course not. It’s a terrible idea.

So why did Forbes publish this article that made that horrendous suggestion?

We have no idea….

There are, of course, many problems with this idea. First of all, libraries cost the average American taxpayer over 18 years old just $4.50 per month. An Amazon Prime subscription alone is nearly double that price and you get very little for free with that subscription because you still have to buy books or pay more to gain access to premium goods or services. If you want audio books or eBooks on Amazon, you need to pay for an Audible subscription or Kindle unlimited ($10 a month or twice the cost of a library) but you can get that for free through Overdrive (Libby) at your local library. If you want newly released movies, you have to buy the premium Amazon channels or you can get those for free at your library. If you want access to premium music you have to pay another $7.99 a month on Amazon or you can use Freegal or Hoopla at your library for free. And, if you want magazines, you can just get those for free from your library with Zinio or PressReader……

cost of various library services compared to costs of Amazon services

Return on Investment for Public Libraries
Library Research Service
Public Libraries – A Wise Investment
Final Report

Individual Reports for Participating Libraries
Cortez Public Library
Denver Public Library
Douglas County Libraries
Eagle Valley Library District
Fort Morgan Public Library
Mesa County Public Library District
Montrose Library District
Rangeview Library District

Study-Related Information and Resources
Personal ROI Calculator
Calculate your individual estimated return on investment based on your personal library use

Library ROI Calculator https://www.lrs.org/public/roi/calculator.php
Calculate an estimated ROI for your library

CAL Presentation
PowerPoint presentation of “Public Libraries – A Wise Investment” from 2007 Colorado Association of Libraries Conference

Questions for Key Informants
Approaches to use for key informant interviews during the study

Institutional Arrangements for Public Library Funding and Spending

Source: Carol Ebdon, Ji Hyung Park, Aimee L. Franklin, Jonathan Moore, American Review of Public Administration, Article first published online: July 3, 2018
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Wide variation in institutional structure and funding patterns in public libraries make this government function useful for exploring the effect of these differences on expenditures. Based on literature related to willingness to pay, special districts, and fiscal illusion, we hypothesize that libraries with taxing authority and more revenues from nonlocal sources will have higher levels of spending. We use data from an Annual Public Library Survey, and U.S. Census data, in ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions for 2007 and 2010. We find that taxing authority leads to increased spending, as expected. However, the results of funding sources are contrary to expectations; relative reliance on nonlocal sources is generally associated with lower levels of spending. This may be due to “crowding-out” of local sources, and there may also be some effect from reduced state aid following the Great Recession.