Category Archives: Law Enforcement

Recruitment, Hiring, and Retention Resources for Law Enforcement

Source: Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, May 2008

Links to online resources for recruiting, hiring, and retaining law enforcement staff are provided at this website. Resource links are organized into these areas: recruitment and hiring; retention and training; ethics and integrity; early intervention; and managing stress.

Campus Law Enforcement, 2004-05

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics

From abstract:
Presents findings from a BJS survey of campus law enforcement agencies serving 4-year colleges and universities with 2,500 or more students. The survey covered the 2004-05 academic year and collected data from agencies using sworn police officers and those using only nonsworn security officers. The report compares law enforcement agencies serving public and private campuses by number and type of employees, screening methods used for hiring officers, training and education requirements for officers, agency functions, types of equipment, computers and information systems, special programs, and written policy directives. General campus characteristics, including crime statistics, are also summarized. Appendix tables include data from 2-year public colleges with an enrollment of 10,000 or more.

Full Report (PDF; 191 KB)

Donning and Doffing: The New Wave of FLSA Litigation

Source: Brian Walter and Cepideh Roufougar, IPMA-HR News, December, 2007
(Scroll down) (subscription required)

Throughout the state of California and the United States, police officers are demanding compensation for time spent putting on and taking off their police uniforms. This rash of “donning and doffing” cases is based on a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court involving employees working in a meat processing plant. Courts all over the country are now facing the question: “What do police officers have in common with meat processing plant workers?” Public employers are anxiously awaiting an answer to this question, as the answer could cost employers and the public tens of millions of dollars.

2007: A Deadly Year for U.S. Law Enforcement

Source: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund/Concerns of Police Survivors

From news release:
2007 has been a deadly year for law enforcement in the United States, with 186 officers killed nationwide as of December 26, according to preliminary statistics from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) and Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.). When compared with 2006, when 145 officers died, officer fatalities rose more than 28 percent this year. Outside of 2001, when 239 officers died — 72 in the September 11 terrorist attacks — 2007 is the deadliest year for American law enforcement since 1989, the NLEOMF and C.O.P.S. said in their preliminary report on 2007 officer deaths.

The number of officers killed by gunfire and in traffic-related incidents both increased in 2007, the latter reaching a record high of 81. So far this year, 69 officers have been shot and killed, up 33 percent from 2006, when there were 52 fatal shootings. Six times this year, two or more officers were gunned down in the same incident, including a shooting that killed three Odessa (TX) Police officers in early September.

Law Enforcement Officer Deaths, 2007 (PDF; 1.3 MB)

BJS – Justice Expenditure and Employment Extracts Series

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, annually since 1980

Bureau of Justice Statistics – Expenditure and Employment Statistics: “Since 1980, these data have been extracted from the Census Bureau’s Annual Government Finance Survey and Annual Survey of Public Employment. This series includes national and State-by-State estimates of government expenditures and employment for the following justice categories: police protection, all judicial (including prosecution, courts, and public defense), and corrections. Federal data for the same categories are also included, as are data for the largest local governments (counties with populations of 500,000 or more and cities with populations of 300,000 or more). The unit of analysis in the CJEE is the government. For example, the corrections employment reported for any particular State represents the total of all correctional personnel employed by that State regardless of which prison, probation office, or other corrections agency employ them. Annually since 1980.”
See also:
National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

How to Collect and Analyze Data: A Manual for Sheriffs and Jail Administrators, 3rd edition

Source: Gail Elias, U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections, NIC Accession Number 021826, July 2007

This National Institute of Corrections manual provides guidance on how information affects policy decision making. Topics include good management; data collection; how to locate and capture information; analyzing, interpreting, and sharing information; and getting the most from your information system.

Law Enforcement Officer Deaths Rose Sharply During First Six Months of 2007

Source: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and Concerns of Police Survivors, Research Report, July 2007

From the press release:
The number of law enforcement officers killed in the United States soared by 44 percent during the first six months of 2007, and for the first time in three decades, more than 100 officer deaths were recorded by the halfway point of the year, according to preliminary statistics from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) and Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS).

The groups’ preliminary data indicate 101 local, state and federal law enforcement officers were killed between January 1 and June 30, 2007, an increase from the 70 officers who lost their lives during the same period of 2006. The last time the mid-year total was that high was 1978, when there were 105 officer deaths. By year-end that year, 213 officers had been killed in the line of duty. In 2006, the year-end total was 145.

Of the 101 officers killed during the first half of 2007, 45 died in traffic-related incidents. That’s an increase of 36 percent from the 33 traffic-related fatalities during the first six months of 2006. This year’s figure includes 35 officers who died in automobile crashes, six who were struck by automobiles while outside their own vehicles and four who died in motorcycle crashes.

CRIME IN THE U.S. The Preliminary Stats for 2006

Source: Report issued by Robert S. Mueller III, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Justice, June 4, 2007

From the summary:
We’ve just released our preliminary crime statistics for 2006…and they’re available in full only here on this website. The big picture? Nationwide, violent crime in the U.S. increased 1.3 percent and property crime decreased 2.9 percent over 2005.

The stats, which we collected from more than 11,700 law enforcement agencies nationwide, show a rise in violent crime for the second straight year. The increase, however, is less than the 2.3 percent figure reported for 2005 and the 3.7 percent increase reflected in the preliminary six-month report for 2006 released in December.

Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies, 2004

Source: Brian A. Reaves, Bureau of Justice Statistics Bulletin, NCJ 212749, June 2007

Reports the results of a census, conducted every four years, of all State and local law enforcement agencies operating nationwide. The report provides the number of employees of State and local law enforcement agencies as of September 2004, including State-by-State data for sheriffs’ offices, local police departments, State police and highway patrol agencies, and special jurisdiction police.
Highlights include the following:

• In September 2004, 17,876 State and local law enforcement agencies with the equivalent of at least 1 full-time officer were operating in the U.S.
• From 2000 to 2004, full-time employment by State and local law enforcement agencies nationwide increased overall by 57,400 (or 5.6%).
• Although local police employment was up slightly nationwide from 2000 to 2004, 20 of the nation’s 50 largest local police departments saw a decline in sworn personnel during this period, including 6 of the 7 largest.

+ Press release