Category Archives: Higher Education

A growing Jeffco program trains future early childhood workers while they’re still in high school

Source: Ann Schimke, Chalkbeat, May 18, 2018

….The internship, which ended in early May, is one component of a new early childhood career pathway offered at the high school. The year-long program also includes two early childhood classes and leads to an entry-level certificate from Red Rocks Community College that qualifies students to be assistant preschool or child care teachers.

Salazar — and students in similar concurrent enrollment programs around Colorado — represents one segment of the child care field’s next generation. With their professional lives just beginning, the students are laying the foundation to earn further credentials and become the lead preschool teachers and directors of the future. It’s a vision straight out of the state’s three-year plan to build a strong early childhood workforce. But in a field known for low pay and high turnover, keeping these students in the pipeline is no small task…..

Related:
Colorado’s Early Childhood Workforce 2020 Plan
Source: Colorado Department of Education, Early Childhood Leadership Commission (ECLC), June 2017

Time Demands of Single Mother College Students and the Role of Child Care in their Postsecondary Success

Source: Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, Barbara Gault, Jooyeoun Suh, Mary Ann DeMario, Institute for Women’s Policy Research, IWPR C468, May 2018

From the summary:
Single mothers enrolled in postsecondary education face substantial time demands that make persistence and graduation difficult. Just 28 percent of single mothers graduate with a degree or certificate within 6 years of enrollment and another 55 percent leave school before earning a college credential (IWPR 2017a). The combination of raising a family on their own, going to class, completing coursework, and holding a job can place serious constraints on single mothers’ time that can force them to make hard choices about their pursuit of higher education. Expanded supports for single mothers in college would allow more women to consider and complete college degrees and enjoy economically secure futures.

Ohio State University – salary information

Source: Ohio State University, Office of Human Resources, 2018

From the press release:
The Ohio State University is breaking new ground for transparency among public universities in Ohio by making all non-student employee salaries available to the public in an online, searchable web-based application. ….

…. In calendar year 2017, 42,670 faculty and staff received $2.5 billion in total earnings – representing a one-year employee headcount increase of 1,855 (4.5 percent) and a 6.4 percent increase over the 2016 $2.35 billion payroll budget. The 2017 median annual base salary stood at $48,173, compared to $47,661 in 2016 – a 1.1 percent increase.

Two types of data are available on the Human Resources website: Users may enter a name, department, title or salary range to search for base salary information in the web-based application. A second option is available to download Excel spreadsheets of total employee earnings for calendar year 2017, which includes bonuses, overtime, deferred compensation, and vacation and sick leave payouts in addition to base salary. The data will be updated throughout the calendar year…..

Post-Secondary Employment Outcomes (PSEO) (Beta)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, April 2018

From the press release:
The U.S. Census Bureau announced the release of the first data sets from a pilot public-use data product on labor market outcomes for college graduates, offering prospective students a useful tool and a fresh perspective in their considerations of post-secondary education. This release covers graduates from the University of Texas System. A release scheduled for later this year will cover students within the Colorado Department of Higher Education. The Census Bureau’s Post-Secondary Employment Outcomes pilot research program is being conducted in cooperation with higher education institutional systems to examine college degree attainment and graduate earnings. Through agreements with the Census Bureau, Texas and Colorado provided administrative education data on enrollment and graduation provided by their university systems, which the Census Bureau matched with national jobs statistics produced by the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics program in the Center for Economic Studies…..

Flawed Judgment in Use of Force Against Students?

Source: Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, Inside Higher Ed, April 19, 2018

Only some college and university police officers are being trained to handle students’ mental health crises, experts say.

….Ideally, university police forces would be trained with a deep 40-hour program called the Memphis model, in which they’re taught how to ease the stress of a student experiencing a mental health break, James said. Developed by the University of Memphis’s Crisis Intervention Team Center, the training introduces cops to victims of mental health crises. The Atlantic reported that officers trained in this method are much less likely to use force when dealing with people with mental health problems…..

State Higher Education Finance (SHEF) Fiscal Year 2017

Source: State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2018

From the press release:
In FY
201 7, for the first time in our nation’s history, more than half of all states relied more heavily on tuition dollars to fund their public systems of higher education than on government appropriations, despite increased state and local support for public colleges and universities. That’s the overarching narrative of the State Higher Education Finance (SHEF) FY 2017 report, a comprehensive, nonpartisan analysis of educational appropriations, tuition revenue and enrollment trends in all 50 states, released today by the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association (SHEEO).

In FY 2017, states saw a moderate increase in state and local support for higher education, along with a slight increase in tuition revenue and nearly no change in full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment. Yet despite five straight years of increases in public investments, constant dollar state support of higher education per FTE student remains $1,000 lower than before the 2008 Great Recession and $2,000 lower than before the 2001 dot-com crash. What’s more, states are increasingly dependent on tuition revenue as a major funding source for public colleges and universities, which could pose significant sustainability challenges as states continue their efforts to increase the percentage of their residents with some education beyond high school to meet their workforce needs. ….

….Five key takeaways from this year’s report include:
1. Overall, states moderately expanded their support for higher education in FY 2017. ….
2. State financial aid for students attending public institutions reached an all-time high. ….
3. For the first time, more than half of all states relied more on tuition than on government appropriations to finance their systems of higher education. ….
4. Total educational revenues are at the highest level since 1980. ….
5. Full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment continues to taper, though not significantly. ….

Related:
Interactive data
Full Unadjusted Dataset – Excel
Appropriations, Tuition, and Enrollment, by State – Excel
Changes since Great Recession, by State – Excel
Figures and Tables

Increased federal financial aid and research, funding is credit positive for universities

Source: Jared Brewster, Susan I Fitzgerald, Edith Behr, Kendra M. Smith, Moody’s, Sector Comment, March 28, 2018
(subscription required)

The recently enacted federal spending bill provides funding increases for key financial aid programs and federal agencies that provide research grants. Financial aid programs receiving a funding bump include Pell Grants, the Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program and the Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program. Significant providers of research and development (R&D) grants with a funding boost include the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). These funding increases are better than we expected in our 2018 outlook for higher education and are credit positive for the sector overall.

Related:
Federal capital programs provide credit positive financing for some universities
Source: Jared Brewster, Susan I Fitzgerald, Edith Behr, Kendra M. Smith, Moody’s, Sector Comment, March 29, 2018
(subscription required)

How occupational licensing matters for wages and careers

Source: Ryan Nunn, Brookings Institution, Hamilton Project, March 2018

From the summary:
Occupational licensing—the legal requirement that a credential be obtained in order to practice a profession—is a common labor market regulation that ostensibly exists to protect public health and safety. However, by limiting access to many occupations, licensing imposes substantial costs: consumers pay higher prices, economic opportunity is reduced for unlicensed workers, and even those who successfully obtain licenses must pay upfront costs and face limited geographic mobility. In addition, licensing often prescribes and constrains the ways in which work is structured, limiting innovation and economic growth…..