Category Archives: Government

Wikipedia For Politics? A New Site Gives It A Try

Source: Declan McCullagh, CNET, October 9, 2007

A political Web site set to launch on Tuesday plans to become a kind of Wikipedia-like destination specializing in elections, governments, and political candidates.

The idea behind is to provide a neutral, one-stop source of information about politics (and politicians) to which anyone can contribute. Changes must be approved by a staff editor before they take effect.
Related sites:
From the Center for Media and Democracy:
Coming this Week in Congress
The 2008 U.S. Congressional Elections Portal
U.S. presidential election, 2008
See also:
Beta of LOUIS (Library Of Unified Information Sources) Database

U.S. Government Manual, 2007-2008 Edition

Source: Office of the Federal Register and the National Archives and Records Administration, Revised June 1, 2007

As the official handbook of the Federal Government, the United States Government Manual provides comprehensive information on the agencies of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches. It also includes information on quasi-official agencies, international organizations in which the United States participates, and boards, commissions, and committees. The Manual begins with reprints of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. The new edition of the Manual is available annually in late summer.

Taking the Lead: 2007 State Legislative Successes in Enacting Progressive Policy

Source: Nathan Newman, J. Mijin Cha, Adam Thompson, Progressive States Network, August 2007

On issues ranging from health care to clean energy to electoral reform to assisting working families, state leaders have stepped up and delivered often precedent-setting reforms. Even on issues like the minimum wage where we have seen some federal action, many states are still delivering higher wage standards and bolder leadership. And on other national issues, states in 2007 took leadership in demanding fairer trade deals and an end of the escalation in Iraq. The bottom line is that states are driving progressive change in the nation.

U.S.: State Legislation: 50-State Legislative Tracking Web Resources

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, July 2007

At the request of NCSL’s Legislative Research Librarians (LRL) staff section, NCSL has developed this resource of 50-state compilations covering various issues that concern state legislators and legislative staff. Here you will find a topical, alphabetical listing of legislative and statutory databases, compilations and state charts/maps.

See also:
NCSL Legislative Research Librarians Staff Section
● Publications include:
Children and the Internet: Laws Relating to Filtering, Blocking and Usage Policies in Schools and Libraries
Legislative Research Librarians Newsline

Rediscovering Federalism

Source: Pietro S. Nivola, The Brookings Institution, Issues in Governance Studies, no. 8, July 2007

From the summary:
This paper stipulates that federalism can offer government a helpful division of labor. The essay argues that the central government in the United States has grown inordinately preoccupied with concerns better left to local authorities. The result is an overextended government, too often distracted from higher priorities. To restore some semblance of so-called “subsidiarity”—that is, a more suitable delineation of competences among levels of government—the essay takes up basic principles that ought to guide that quest. Finally, the paper advances several suggestions for how particular policy pursuits might be devolved.

The Blogging Revolution: Government in the Age of Web 2.0

Source: David C. Wyld, IBM Center for the Business of Government, E-Government Series, 2007

Dr. Wyld examines the phenomenon of blogging in the context of the larger revolutionary forces at play in the development of the second-generation Internet, where interactivity among users is key. This is also referred to as “Web 2.0.” Wyld observes that blogging is growing as a tool for promoting not only online engagement of citizens and public servants, but also offline engagement. He describes blogging activities by members of Congress, governors, city mayors, and police and fire departments in which they engage directly with the public. He also describes how blogging is used within agencies to improve internal communications and speed the flow of information.

Based on the experiences of the blogoneers, Wyld develops a set of lessons learned and a checklist of best practices for public managers interested in following in their footsteps. He also examines the broader social phenomenon of online social networks and how they affect not only government but also corporate interactions with citizens and customers.
Subject: Public Sector