Category Archives: Flexible Work Arrangements

Nearly half of employees now working from home want to stay remote, study finds

Source: Employee Benefits Management Directions, Benefits News, No. 707, Benefits News, June 2, 2020
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From the abstract:
In a matter of weeks, the COVID-19 crisis has forced millions of American workers into remote work, says The Grossman Group. According to their new survey, many prefer keeping that arrangement. Forty-eight percent of employees working from home now say they’d like to continue working from home.

Related:
New Study from The Grossman Group: Nearly Half of Employees Now Working from Home Want to Stay Remote
Source: David Grossman, leadercommunicator blog, May 13, 2020

COVID-19 and Remote Work: An Early Look at US Data

Source: Erik Brynjolfsson, John J. Horton, Adam Ozimek, Daniel Rock, Garima Sharma, Hong-Yi TuYe, NBER Working Paper No. 27344, June 2020

From the abstract:
We report the results of a nationally-representative sample of the US population during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey ran in two waves from April 1-5, 2020 and May 2-8, 2020. Of those employed pre-COVID-19, we find that about half are now working from home, including 35.2% who report they were commuting and recently switched to working from home. In addition, 10.1% report being laid-off or furloughed since the start of COVID-19. There is a strong negative relationship between the fraction in a state still commuting to work and the fraction working from home. We find that the share of people switching to remote work can be predicted by the incidence of COVID-19 and that younger people were more likely to switch to remote work. Furthermore, states with a higher share of employment in information work including management, professional and related occupations were more likely to shift toward working from home and had fewer people laid off or furloughed. We find no substantial change in results between the two waves, suggesting that most changes to remote work manifested by early April.

From Face Time to Flex Time: The Role of Physical Space in Worker Temporal Flexibility

Source: Leroy Gonsalves, Administrative Science Quarterly, OnlineFirst, Published February 27, 2020
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From the abstract:
Despite the great potential for flexible work policies to increase worker temporal flexibility—the extent to which workers control when and where their work tasks are completed—organizational scholars have found that employees rarely use them for fear of career penalties. This study sheds light on this flexibility paradox by drawing attention to the overlooked yet crucial role of physical space. Using 14 months of field research during an office redesign at a large professional sales organization, I find that a reconfiguration of physical space intended to reduce costs had the unintended consequence of disrupting taken-for-granted greeting practices, noticing practices, and evaluative beliefs. Changes to social practices led employees to feel less concern about trait inferences of dependability and commitment arising from their physical presence and to experience greater temporal flexibility. The findings contribute to a model in which the relationship between flexible work policies and temporal flexibility is moderated by the physical space. By identifying the physical space as a novel determinant of temporal flexibility, the study reveals the structural underpinnings of the flexibility paradox and more generally contributes to our understanding of how physical spaces structure social life in organizations.

Work-Life Balance in the Digital Workplace: The Impact of Schedule Flexibility and Telecommuting on Work-Life Balance and Overall Life Satisfaction

Source: Dong-Jin LeeM. Joseph Sirgy, Thriving in Digital Workspaces, First Online: 31 August 2019
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From the abstract:
The goal of this chapter is to develop a theoretical model of work-life balance specific to the digital workplace. We first discuss two characteristics of the digital workplace: schedule flexibility and telecommuting. We then describe a formative conceptualisation of work-life balance involving a set of inter-domain strategies people use to enhance (or preserve) overall life satisfaction—behaviour-based strategies (role engagement in multiple domains, role enrichment, domain compensation, role conflict management, etc.) and cognition-based strategies (whole-life perspective, positive affect spillover, value compensation and segmentation). We then propose and explain how schedule flexibility and telecommuting in the digital workplace have a positive influence on the aforementioned work-life balance strategies and consequently overall life satisfaction and thriving.

Increasing Employee Motivation and Organization Productivity by Implementing Flex-Time

Source: Trish A. Petak, Gabbie S. Miller, American Society of Business and Behavioral Sciences, ASBBS Proceedings of the 26th Annual Conference, 2019
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From the abstract:
Businesses are more efficient when employees are motivated and productive. This study investigated the correlation between flex-time and motivation in employees, as well as flex-time and productivity in employees. The research methodology used for this study was correlation research designed to examine the relationship between flex-time and motivation and the relationship between flex-time and productivity. This quantitative study consisted of 63 voluntary participants. The findings of this study illustrated a very strong positive correlation between flex-time and employee motivation and a strong positive relationship between flex-time and employee productivity.

Family-Friendly Policies, Gender, and Work–Life Balance in the Public Sector

Source: Mary K. Feeney, Justin M. Stritch, Review of Public Personnel Administration, Volume 39 Issue 3, September 2019
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From the abstract:
Family-friendly policies and culture are important components of creating a healthy work environment and are positively related to work outcomes for public employees and organizations. Furthermore, family-friendly policies and culture are critical mechanisms for supporting the careers and advancement of women in public service and enhancing gender equity in public sector employment. While both policies and culture can facilitate women’s participation in the public sector workforce, they may affect men and women differently. Using data from a 2011 study with a nationwide sample of state government employees, we investigate the effects of employee take-up of leave policies, employer supported access to child care, alternative work scheduling, and a culture of family support on work–life balance (WLB). We examine where these variables differ in their effects on WLB among men and women and make specific recommendations to further WLB among women. The results inform the literature on family-friendly policies and culture in public organizations.

Work–Life Program Participation and Employee Work Attitudes: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis Using Matching Methods

Source: Sun Young Kim, David Lee, Review of Public Personnel Administration, OnlineFirst, January 13, 2019

From the abstract:
Work–life programs (WLPs) have been widely adopted and implemented by public organizations as a means of providing employees with greater choices and flexibility in coordinating their work and personal lives. Although previous research has shown that these programs are positively related to various employee attitudes and behaviors, empirical evidence about whether and how such relationships vary by type of WLP is relatively scant. In this study, we categorize WLPs into two different types—work-oriented and life-oriented programs—and explore whether and how participating in distinct types of WLPs has varying impacts on employee work attitudes. A series of Mahalanobis distance matching is conducted using data from the 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. The results indicate that the use of life-oriented programs has a positive and substantive impact on employee satisfaction and commitment, while the effect of participating in work-oriented programs is not statistically significant

On the Grid 24/7/365 and the Right to Disconnect

Source: C. W. Von Bergen, Martin S. Bressler, and Trevor L. Proctor, Employee Relations Law Journal, Vol. 45, No. 2, Autumn 2019
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From the abstract:
Technological developments over the past few decades in laptop computers, smartphones, wifi connectivity, and other digital communication approaches have made it easier for people to work remotely. While many appreciate the flexibility and increased productivity these technological advancements provide, some lament that the ability to work anywhere, anytime has transformed into the expectation to work everywhere, all the time. The authors of this article discuss the issue and examine domestic and international right to disconnect practices.

Treading Water: The Current Challenges of Women’s Work

Source: Shilpa Phadke and Diana Boesch, Center for American Progress, January 18, 2019

…. This column reviews how women’s work is segmented and undervalued; how workers at the margins—such as domestic workers, farm laborers, part-time workers, and gig economy workers—face persistent barriers and inequality; and how policymakers must prioritize centering workers’ voices and holistic needs and experiences as they craft meaningful economic policy. While this column does not detail the myriad ways in which women often struggle to maintain their economic security to the detriment of their health, it is important to emphasize that women do not live their lives in silos, and access to a range of programs and policies, such as comprehensive reproductive health services, as well as access to affordable education and skills-based learning, are critical to women’s economic success. ….