Category Archives: Education

Postsecondary Institutions and Cost of Attendance in 2017-18; Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2016-17; and 12-Month Enrollment: 2016-17: First Look (Preliminary Data)

Source: Scott A. Ginder, Janice E. Kelly-Reid, Farrah B. Mann, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), Publication #: NCES 2018060, May 2018

From the abstract:
This First Look presents preliminary data findings from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) fall 2017 collection, which included three survey components: Institutional Characteristics for the 2017-18 academic year, Completions covering the period July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2017, and data on 12-Month Enrollment for the 2016-17 academic year.

Which States Spend the Most Money on Their Students?

Source: Stephen Wheeler, U.S. Census Bureau, America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers, June 2018

In 2016, public elementary and secondary schools across the nation received $353.2 billion in state and federal revenue, most of which goes into expenditures such as teacher’s salaries, transportation and other associated expenses.

So who’s spending the most on their students?

Moving Beyond the Degree Debate

Source: Linda Smith, Bipartisan Policy Center blog, April 30, 2018

The draft Power to the Profession framework outlining professional qualifications for early care and learning professionals has reopened a debate in the early childhood community that many felt had been put to rest with the publication of the report Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation from the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM). In fact, most had hoped that it had been put to rest. But the new draft framework includes a recommendation that an associate degree, or AA, be the entry-level credential for early childhood educators. So, necessarily, here we are again, debating whether a bachelor’s degree, or BA, is the appropriate entry-level credential for a lead early childhood educator.

American Attitudes Toward Teacher Pay and Protests

Source: Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, April 2018

The April 2018 AP-NORC Poll asked 1,140 adults their views on teacher pay and recent protests advocating for more school funding.

​On April 19, 2018, teachers in Arizona voted to walk off the job to demand increased school funding, joining the movement for higher teacher pay that began in February in West Virginia and has spread to Kentucky, Oklahoma, and Colorado. In a recent survey conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 78 percent of Americans say teachers in this country are underpaid, but fewer approve of walkouts by teachers to demand pay raises and increased school funding.

Fifty-two percent approve of teachers striking to protest low teacher pay and school funding cuts, while 25 percent disapprove and 22 percent neither approve nor disapprove. But who is to blame when teacher labor unrest disrupts students’ education? Americans say there is plenty of blame to go around. ….

…. Seventy-eight percent of adults say public school teachers get paid too little for the work that they do, 6 percent say they get paid too much, and 15 percent say they get paid the right amount. Still, only 50 percent would support a plan to increase their taxes in order to increase teacher compensation and funding for their local public schools, while 26 percent would oppose such a plan, and 23 percent neither favor nor oppose. ….

Related:
Most Americans believe teachers have the right to strike
Source: Ipsos/NPR survey on the public’s views of teachers, April 26, 2018

A recent survey conducted on behalf of NPR shows that just one in four Americans believe teachers in this country are paid fairly. Furthermore, three-quarters agree teachers have the right to strike, including two-thirds of Republicans, three-quarters of independents and nearly 9 in 10 Democrats. 

Though nearly two-thirds approve of national teachers’ unions, an equal number (63%) agree that teachers’ unions do make it harder to fire bad teachers. Half of Americans (51%) agree that teachers’ unions improve both the quality of education and teachers, though these two questions vary based on party affiliation. Two-thirds or more of Democrats agree that teachers’ unions improve the quality of education and teachers, compared to less than half of Republicans…..

HPU Poll: NC Republicans and Democrats Agree on Education Issues
Source: March 7, 2018

…. Teacher pay raises: Majorities of North Carolinians also say that public school teachers are paid too little (85 percent) and claim that they would be willing to pay more in taxes so that North Carolina school teachers could be paid at the national average within five years (73 percent). In fact, large majorities of Democrats (72 percent), Republicans (72 percent), and unaffiliated (76 percent) residents of North Carolina say they would pay more in taxes for such a teacher pay raise. ….

New polls find most Americans say teachers are underpaid — and many would pay higher taxes to fix it
Source: Valerie Strauss, Washington Post, June 1, 2018

Teachers Find Public Support as Campaign for Higher Pay Goes to Voters
Source: Dana Goldstein and Ben Casselman, New York Times, May 31, 2018

Declining enrollment credit negative due to continued pressure on net tuition revenue

Source: Edison Castaneda, Susan I Fitzgerald, Dennis M. Gephardt, Moody’s, Sector Comment, May 29, 2018
(subscription required)

On May 21, the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center (NSCRC) released data showing that enrollment at US colleges and universities declined by 1.3% year-over-year in spring 2018 with some variation by type of institution (see Exhibit 1). This enrollment decline is credit negative for the sector given US colleges and universities’ high reliance on tuition and other student-generated revenue. Tuition and other student-generated income represents roughly 74% and 61% of revenue for four-year public and four-year private universities, respectively. Demographic trends and tuition pricing constraints will continue to suppress tuition revenue growth in fiscal 2018 with Moody’s projecting median net tuition revenue growth to increase just 2.4% for public universities and 2.0% for privates. Additionally, we project over 20% of public universities and 23% of privates to have declining net tuition revenue in fiscal 2018.

Related:
Current Term Enrollment Estimates – Spring 2018
Source: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, Spring 2018

From the overview:
In spring 2018, overall postsecondary enrollments decreased1.3 percent from the previous spring. Figure1 shows the 12-month percentage change (fall-to-fall and spring-to-spring) for each term over the last three years. Enrollments decreased among four-year for-profit institutions (-6.8 percent), two-year public institutions (-2.0 percent), four-year private nonprofit institutions (-0.4 percent), and four-year public institutions (-0.2 percent). Taken as a whole, public sector enrollments (two year and four-year combined) declined by 0.9 percent this spring. Current Term Enrollment Estimates, published every December and May by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, include national enrollment estimates by institutional sector, state, enrollment intensity, age group, and gender. Enrollment estimates are adjusted for Clearinghouse data coverage rates by institutional sector, state, and year. As of spring 2018, postsecondary institutions actively submitting enrollment data to the Clearinghouse account for 97 percent of enrollments at U.S. Title IV, degree-granting institutions. Most institutions submit enrollment data to the Clearinghouse several times per term, resulting in highly current data. Moreover, since the Clearinghouse collects data at the student level, it is possible to report an unduplicated headcount, which avoids double-counting students who are simultaneously enrolled at multiple institutions.

Pressure on states to increase K-12 education funding will continue

Source: Pisei Chea, Nicholas Samuels, Emily Raimes, Timothy Blake, Nadia Morelos, Moody’s, Sector In-Depth, June 4, 2018
(subscription required)

Public demand to increase K-12 education funding has grown in many states, a reaction to years of restrained spending in this area since the 2008-09 recession. Between fiscal 2002-07, total K-12 funding from federal, state and local sources increased at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.8%, then slowed to a CAGR of 1.8% from 2009-16 despite the economic recovery. The slowdown was driven by declining federal funding, slow state and local tax revenue growth, and generally more austere policy priorities in some state capitals. Teachers in a handful of states have recently organized walkouts to demand higher teacher salaries and increased education spending. States have significant flexibility to adjust their budgets to meet policy demands, especially as tax revenue growth has strengthened in the past year; willingness to do so varies, however, and states will continue to be pressured to balance K-12 spending with other program demands.
….

Before It All Melts Away

Source: Chris Brooks, Labor Notes, May 30, 2018

Will this spring’s wave of teacher strikes lead to stronger unions? Not if their unions return to business as usual.

The motor force behind the strikes in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Arizona, Colorado, and North Carolina is teachers’ deep frustration. Educators are feeling the pinch from decades of funding cuts that their unions have been unable to stop…..

When Teachers Strike, Support Staff Has the Most to Lose

Source: Madeline Will, Education Week, May 29, 2018

The national spotlight on the strikes and walkouts this spring has been on the teachers themselves. But in the shadows was another group that’s just as critical for keeping schools running: support staff.

Often overlooked in the broader public discourse, these workers, including instructional aides and paraprofessionals, sometimes had more at stake in the walkouts than full-time teachers. When schools were closed, many didn’t get paid.

Early Learning Legislation in the States: 2018 Update

Source: Adrienne Fischer, National Conference of State Legislatures, May 23, 2018

States are leading the way with creative and timely solutions to support pre-K through third grade education (P-3).

Red and blue states alike are increasing investments in public pre-K programs, while others that are new to providing state-funded pre-K are looking at initial outcomes. Meanwhile, several other states are grappling with funding decisions.

Overall, legislation varies widely, from assessing school readiness in Utah, to providing quality improvement grants for low-income pre-K students in Colorado, to limiting suspension and expulsion of P-3 students in Virginia.

Check out NCSL’s new P-3 Education Bill Tracker for an interactive look at P-3 education bills introduced and enacted  from 2018 legislative sessions. States have filed more than 300 bills across a broad spectrum of issues related to early learning. Legislators’ focus this session has been on pre-K, comprising 22 percent of all P-3 education bills filed.