Category Archives: Compensation

Database of Trump administration officials’ personal finances grows

Source: Center for Public Integrity, June 7, 2017

The Center for Public Integrity today added more than 100 new Trump administration officials’ financial disclosures to a searchable, sortable database first launched in April.

The database allows anyone to easily understand the wealth, assets and business interests of many of the people working for President Donald Trump.

These include Senate-confirmed appointees, White House aides and members of so-called “beachhead teams” sent to prepare executive agencies for the new administration. Among the prominent Trump allies included in the database update: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, Defense Secretary James Mattis, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, Transportation Secretary Eliane Chao and White House Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

The new disclosures are possible thanks to the Center for Public Integrity’s collaboration with ProPublica — a fellow Pulitzer Prize-winning nonprofit news organization — which requested the disclosure forms from government sources and made the disclosures available as PDF files…..

Related:
New database details White House officials’ finances
Source: Center for Public Integrity, April 4, 2017

On Friday night, the White House began releasing financial disclosures for scores of key employees — including familiar names such as Press Secretary Sean Spicer, Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway and Chief Strategist Stephen K. Bannon.

Reporters from dozens of news organizations, including the Associated Press, the New York Times, ProPublica and the Washington Post, then compiled and reported on the documents, which the White House released one-by-one.

The Center for Public Integrity compiled data from those disclosures into a searchable, sortable database, which provide a window into the wealth, assets and business interests of many of the people closest to President Donald Trump. The Center for Public Integrity’s news developer, Chris Zubak-Skees, extracted these details from more than 90 reports, released in PDF format, using a software tool he created….

Workers Need a Bill of Rights

Source: Andrew Strom, OnLabor blog, May 24, 2017

Except for about a month in the summer of 2009 when the Democrats had 60 votes in the Senate, for the entire twenty-first century any proposal to substantially increase workers’ rights at the national level has had to be prefaced by the comment that, “of course, this is not politically feasible now.” But rather than just spending the next four years fending off misguided Republican legislation, I think it’s time to step back and focus on principles that should guide workplace legislation. Toward that end, here are some thoughts on a potential workplace bill of rights.

There might be some other rights that should be included in this list, and maybe folks have ideas about better ways to phrase the various rights. But, I think it would be helpful for the labor movement, worker advocates, and the Democratic party to start talking about this bill of rights in order to refocus our discussion about jobs. The measure of a good job, whether it is in manufacturing or the service sector, should be whether it provides these rights to workers. In addition, we should be thinking about what changes we need to see in our laws to ensure that all workers enjoy these basic rights on the job. Some of these issues can be addressed at the state level, although of course, that would mean that these rights would exist in only a handful of states. Here’s my proposed worker bill of rights – let the debate begin…..

Staff in Higher Education Salary Survey – 2016

Source: College and University Professional Association for Human Resources (CUPA-HR), 2017
(subscription required)

From the summary:
The Staff Salary Survey (formerly the Non-Exempt Staff Salary Survey) collects annualized salary data for positions commonly found in higher education institutions. The positions in the survey are mostly non-exempt, meaning that job incumbents are generally paid an hourly rate and are eligible for overtime. To ensure comparability of data across respondents, all institutions are asked to report the annual salary each incumbent would receive for working 2080 hours in 12 months without overtime. All survey positions are matched to BLS Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) codes to facilitate completion of IPEDS reporting requirements.

For the first time, information on exempt status, gender, ethnicity, years in position, and age was collected for each position on the Staff in Higher Education Salary Survey. Data for each of these variables is summarized in the report and available in DataOnDemand.
Related:
Overview

An Activist View of CEO Compensation

Source: Alex Baum, David Robert Hale, Mason Morfit, David F. Larcker, Brian Tayan, Stanford University Graduate School of Business Research Paper No. 17-31, April 25, 2017

From the abstract:
Understanding CEO compensation plans is a continuing challenge for directors and investors. The disclosure of these plans is dictated by SEC rules that rely heavily on the “fair value” of awards at the time they are granted. The problem with these numbers is that they are static and do not reflect how pay changes with performance. Activist fund ValueAct Capital has developed a framework to address this problem. Their approach is to strip down and systematically reconstruct the compensation figures in the annual proxy, allowing for a step-by-step evaluation of the conditions under which variable pay is realized. In this Closer Look, we examine this framework in detail.

We ask:
• How useful is this framework in understanding the relation between pay and performance?
• Are large “minimum” payments indicative of managerial abuse?
• What insights does this analysis provide into the governance quality of different firms?
• How might a board monitor to ensure that the CEO is not taking on excessive risk?
• What does it say about SEC rules that the results of this analysis are vastly different from the figures provided in the annual proxy?

Philadelphia Union Wins Equal Pay for Immigrant Nurses

Source: Samantha Winslow, Labor Notes, May 5, 2017

It started when a few nurses at Temple University Hospital told stewards that they weren’t being paid for their experience.

One of the first to speak up was Jessy Palathinkal, who had become a nurse in India in 1990. She got her U.S. nursing license when she moved here in 1995. But when she started working at Temple, her placement on the pay scale was as though those five years of nursing never happened.

She asked why. Human Resources told her the hospital didn’t count years of experience in foreign countries.

“I was feeling a little bit upset. I had all the certification,” Palathinkal said. “I thought, ‘Well, that’s not right, but what can I do?’”

What Palathinkal did was tell her shop steward. The steward told officers of their union, the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals (PASNAP). And the officers started asking around to see whether anyone else was affected.

They put out a call in their monthly newsletter—did anyone else think that their pay was incorrect for their level of experience? Three more nurses had the same complaint.

Four nurses joined a class-action grievance. Management denied it. That’s when union officers decided this was a hospital-wide issue…..

Comparing the Compensation of Federal and Private-Sector Employees, 2011 to 2015

Source: Congressional Budget Office, Report no. 52637, April 25, 2017

From the summary:
During the 2011-2015 period, the difference between the wages, benefits, and total compensation of federal civilian employees and those of similar private-sector employees varied widely depending on the employees’ educational attainment.

Violation Tracker – April 2017 update

Source: Good Jobs First, April 18, 2017

From the press release:
Good Jobs First today announced a large new addition to Violation Tracker, the country’s first public database of corporate crime and misconduct: more than 34,000 cases brought by the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor since the beginning of 2010 for violations of overtime, minimum wage and other provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The largest violators captured by the new data are oilfield services company Halliburton, which in 2015 agreed to an $18 million settlement of alleged overtime violations, and CoreCivic (the new name of private prison operator Corrections Corporation of America), which in 2014 agreed to an $8 million settlement….