Category Archives: Budget – United States

Budget of the United States Government, FY09

Source: Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2009

Issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Budget of the United States Government is a collection of documents that contains the budget message of the President, information about the President’s budget proposals for a given fiscal year, and other budgetary publications that have been issued throughout the fiscal year. Other related and supporting budget publications, such as the Economic Report of the President, are included, which may vary from year to year
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President’s Budget May Provide States With Inadequate Funding To Maintain Current SCHIP Programs – Budget Does Not Provide Funds to Insure More Children

Source: Edwin Park, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, February 7, 2008

December 2007, Congress extended the expiring State Children’s Health Insurance Program through March 2009. As part of his fiscal year 2009 budget, the President proposes to reauthorize SCHIP through the end of fiscal year 2013. The budget proposal would provide an additional $19.7 billion to states for their SCHIP programs, above the $5 billion-a-year funding level assumed in the budget baseline.

The proposed funding increase has been portrayed in some media reports as a significant expansion of SCHIP to cover more children. Yet while the $19.7 billion amount does substantially exceed the amount proposed for SCHIP in the budget the President submitted a year ago, it would not provide sufficient funding for states to significantly expand their SCHIP programs and cover many more uninsured low-income children. In fact, the amount that the President’s new budget proposes for SCHIP likely would not even be sufficient to enable states simply to maintain their current SCHIP programs.

Related Articles:

Bush Budget Gives States Little to Cheer About
Source: Daniel C. Vock and Pamela M. Prah,, February 5, 2008

Federal Grants To States And Localities Cut Deeply In Fiscal Year 2009 Federal Budget

Source: Iris Lav and Phil Oliff, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, February 4, 2008

Grants to state and local governments have long been an important way in which the federal government supports and administers programs efficiently. The new budget, however, continues to significantly erode those grants. This leaves states and localities the option of either curtailing services or increasing their own taxes to compensate for declining federal funds. These cuts would come at a particularly difficult time, when many states already are cutting programs to balance their budgets and half of the states face budget gaps for the upcoming fiscal year of more than $34 billion.

The Dubious Priorities Of The President’s FY 2009 Budget

Source: Robert Greenstein, James R. Horney, and Richard Kogan, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, February 4, 2008

The President’s budget would provide more tax cuts heavily skewed to the most well-off while cutting vital services for low- and moderate-income Americans, generating large deficits, and increasing the strain on states already confronting budget problems as a result of the economic downturn. The budget reflects misguided priorities that would leave the American people more vulnerable in a number of ways.

President’s Budget to Cut Education Spending: New Interactive Map Shows How Much Each State Stands to Lose

Source: Center for American Progress, Press Release, October 15, 2007

The Senate continues the budget battle this week with the consideration of the Labor, Health, and Human Services Appropriations bill, which sets levels for education spending, as well as other key domestic programs. President Bush has already stated he plans to veto the bill because it provides $64.9 billion for the Education Department. Bush’s proposed budget appropriates only $61 billion–$3.9 billion less than Congress’ budget and $1.3 billion less than the Education Department received last year. The Bush administration, in the same year that it is spending $50 billion each month on operations in Iraq, plans on vetoing a bill because it increases funding for American schools by $2.6 billion, among other domestic budget increases. What’s even more surprising is that Education Secretary Margaret Spellings actually announced back in February that Bush’s newly proposed budget would increase education funding by 41 percent relative to 2001. A look at the president’s budget tells a different story. As this new interactive map shows, 44 out of 50 states would see reductions in federal funding for elementary and secondary education for fiscal year 2008 if the Bush administration got its way. Rather than bold increases, states on average will see a -1.4 percent decrease in elementary and secondary school funding.

As Tough Times Wane, States Act to Improve Medicaid Coverage and Quality: Results from a 50-State Medicaid Budget Survey for State Fiscal Years 2007 and 2008

Source: Vernon Smith, Kathleen Gifford, Eileen Ellis, Robin Rudowitz, Molly O’Malley and Caryn Marks, Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, October 2007

From the summary:
The annual 50-state survey of state officials on Medicaid and state budget actions reports enrollment in Medicaid declined for the first time in nearly a decade. The 0.5 percent enrollment decline in fiscal year 2007 was driven primarily by two factors. States reported that the new citizenship documentation requirements were causing significant delays in processing applications, affecting mostly individuals already eligible for the program. State officials also cited the good economy and lower unemployment for reducing enrollment. Faced with an improving economy, 42 states expect to expand coverage to the uninsured in the next year.
See also:
Executive Summary
Press Release

Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid Account for Half of Federal Spending

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Press release, CB07-141, October 9, 2007

From the press release:
Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid accounted for more than $1 trillion of the $2.3 trillion the federal government spent in 2005, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, which publishes the only consolidated source of data on the geographic distribution of federal expenditures.

The Consolidated Federal Funds Report for Fiscal Year 2005 is a presentation of data on most domestic spending by the federal government for state and county areas of the United States, including the District of Columbia and U.S. outlying areas. The data include expenditures for the Defense Department and the Department of Homeland Security.

The report covers direct payments, grants, procurement awards, and salaries and wages by federal agency and program. The report does not include expenditures for selected intelligence agencies, international payments, foreign aid and interest on the federal debt.
Direct to Detailed Tables
Federal Aid to States for Fiscal Year 2005

The Labor – H.H.S. – Education Veto In Context

Source: Richard Kogan, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, October 24, 2007

President Bush has said he will veto the appropriations bill that funds the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education for the coming fiscal year if Congress sends the bill to him with funding at the level either the House or Senate has approved. The Administration says the funding provided in the House- and Senate-passed bills is “excessive” and “irresponsible” and has sought to portray them as part of a congressional plan that would constitute “runaway spending.” This short analysis finds these claims to be misleading or inaccurate.

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Historical Averages Not A Meaningful Benchmark For Future Revenues

Source: Matt Fiedler and Richard Kogan, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, August 22, 2007

The “Mid-Session Review” that the Office of Management and Budget issued last month projects that revenues will be slightly above their 30-year average in 2007, measured as a share of the economy. The Administration and many of its supporters have cited this fact as evidence that current tax policies are generating an appropriate level of revenue and the Administration’s tax cuts therefore should be made permanent without the costs being offset. Similarly, Senator Charles Grassley, the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, has cited this fact as a reason for repealing the Alternative Minimum Tax without offsetting the large costs involved.

The simple fact that the government collected a particular level of revenue in the past says little, however, about what level of revenues is appropriate today, will be appropriate or necessary in the future, or even was appropriate in the past.