Author Archives: afscme

The Salary Question: Negotiating the ins and outs of earning a fair compensation

Source: American Libraries, Vol. 49 nos. 11/12, November/December 2018

For more than 10 years, David Connolly has interacted with job seekers and employers in his role as recruitment ad sales manager with ALA JobLIST, the online career center administered by American Libraries, ACRL’s College and Research Libraries News magazine, and ALA’s Office for Human Resource Development and Recruitment. We asked Connolly for his insights on salary negotiations, including the biggest mistake applicants make regarding salary…..

Unions 101: What library unions do—and don’t do—for workers

Source: Carrie Smith, American Libraries, Vol. 49 nos. 11/12, November/December 2018

….According to a report from the AFL-CIO’s Department for Professional Employees, in 2017 union librarians and library assistants earned on average 31% more per week than their nonunion equivalents. Union library workers are also more likely to have health coverage, retirement plans, and sick leave, the report states.

Yet library unions are as diverse as libraries themselves. Public library workers may be organized in a library-specific union that represents librarians and other staff, or they may be a part of a larger municipal union that represents city or county workers. Academic librarians can find themselves part of a larger faculty union or librarians-only bargaining unit, while school librarians are often members of the local teachers union. Most unions don’t include members in supervisory positions.

The landscape is complex, and it’s difficult to paint a picture of library unionism with one brush, but there are commonalities workers should know…..

Default Study: 2017 U.S. Public Finance Transportation Default Study And Rating Transitions

Source: S&P Global Ratings, November 19, 2018
(subscription required)

Although ratings in the U.S. public finance (USPF) transportation sector tend to be lower than in other areas of U.S. municipal finance, the sector is among the most stable. In addition, transportation ratings are less likely than other USPF ratings to be raised, reflecting economic and competitive pressures.

Point/Counterpoint: Should Governments Subsidize the Construction of New Professional Sports Stadiums?

Source: Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Volume 38 Issue 1, Winter 2019
(subscription required)

Articles include:
Should the Construction of New Professional Sports Facilities Be Subsidized?
Source: Brad R. Humphreys, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Volume 38 Issue 1, Winter 2019Is There a Case for Subsidizing Sports Stadiums?
Source: Victor Matheson, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Volume 38 Issue 1, Winter 2019
(subscription required)

The case in favor of subsidizing large sports facilities is much harder to make than the one against. The peer-reviewed literature typically finds little or no evidence that the construction of new professional sports facilities results in significant increases in any type of measurable economic activity including personal income, wages, employment, tax revenues, or tourist spending (Coates & Humphreys, 2008). In addition, the privately funded consulting reports that frequently accompany stadium proposals, and which invariably tout large economic benefits from subsidized stadiums and arenas, have been shown to suffer from significant theoretical flaws that make their conclusions suspect at best, and simply false at worst (Crompton, 1995). In fact, some academic economists suggest, only partially in jest, that if one wants to know what the true economic impact of a stadium project will be, simply take whatever number the consultants project and then move the decimal point one place to the left.

However, in specific circumstances, it may be possible to justify some level of public subsidies for the construction of sports venues. This should not be interpreted to mean that the optimal level of public spending is the roughly two-thirds of average stadium construction costs that taxpayers paid for during the period from 1990 through 2008 or cwn the roughly one-third of stadium construction costs that taxpayers paid for on average since the Great Recession in 2008. Rather, the only claim being made here is that the optimal level of funding may be higher than zero percent…..

Did California Paid Family Leave Impact Infant Health?

Source: Ariel Marek Pihl, Gaetano Basso, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Volume 38 Issue 1, Winter 2019
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
The effects of paid parental leave policies on infant health have yet to be established. In this paper we investigate these effects by exploiting the introduction of California Paid Family Leave (PFL), the first program in the U.S. that specifically provides working parents with paid time off for bonding with a newborn. We measure health using the full census of infant hospitalizations in California and a set of control states, and implement a differences‐in‐differences approach. Our results suggest a decline in infant admissions, which is concentrated among those causes that are potentially affected by closer childcare (and to a lesser extent breastfeeding). Other admissions that are unlikely to be affected by parental leave do not exhibit the same pattern.

Election 2018: Midterm Analysis

Source: Tim Storey and Wendy Underhill, State Legislatures Magazine, November-December 2018

Republicans Still Control Most of the Nation’s Legislative Seats, but the Gap Between the Parties Narrowed Considerably

Related:
Voters Make Policy
Source: Patrick Potyondy, State Legislatures Magazine, November-December 2018

Citizens Had Their Say on More Than 150 Ballot Measures That Could Transform Their States

What every healthcare facility should do NOW to reduce the potential for workplace violence

Source: Thomas A. Smith, Journal of Healthcare Protection Management, Volume 34 Number 2, 2018
(subscription required)

The increase in workplace violence in healthcare facilities is now recognized by OSHA and other regulatory bodies as well as IAHSS, major nursing organizations, and the Joint Commission according to the author. In this article he reports on the causes and effects of such violence and presents security guidelines for taking action to reduce it as well as how COOs can be convinced to support such action.

Chronic Medical Conditions in Criminal Justice Involved Populations

Source: Amy J. Harzke and Sandi L. Pruitt, Journal of Health and Human Services Administration, Vol. 41 No. 3, 2018
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Nationally representative data collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) have shown increasing and elevated prevalence of a number of non-infectious chronic medical conditions in criminal justice populations relative to the non-institutionalized population. Prevalence of these conditions, including hypertension and arthritis, are especially high among elderly and female prisoners and jail inmates. State- and site- specific prevalence estimates, however, have revealed patterns that are somewhat inconsistent with BJS national data. We summarize the extant literature regarding prevalence of chronic medical conditions in U.S. prison and jail settings, determinants of these conditions across the phases of criminal justice involvement, and potential opportunities for reducing and managing the burden of chronic medical conditions in criminal justice populations. We provide research and policy recommendations for improving measurement of the burden of chronic medical conditions in criminal justice populations, provision of healthcare in correctional settings, and post-release continuity of care and community reentry.

Institutional Design of the ACA Health Insurance Exchanges: Factors Affecting Policy Implementation In State Administration

Source: Shihyun Noh and Christian L. Janousek, Journal of Health and Human Services Administration, Vol. 41 No. 2, Fall 2018
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
In state implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) health insurance exchanges, sixteen states decided to create and administer their own exchanges, determining the institutional location of the exchanges. This institutional design of implementing organizations affects aspects of state policy implementation of the health exchanges, reflecting the intentions of state officials to exert control over the administration of operations and other decisions such as funding sources. This research examines whether state decisions regarding agency assignment of the ACA health exchanges were associated with political, economic, and historical-cultural explanations. This study provides evidence that, in the decision of the location of health insurance exchanges, state officials were influenced by the factors of state budget shortfalls and state histories of creating independent agencies, but not by divided government, compound divided government and state personnel capacity.