Meeting the Demand for Health: Final Report of the California Future Health Workforce Commission

Source: California Future Health Workforce Commission, February 2019

From the summary:

California’s health system is facing a crisis, with rising costs and millions of Californians struggling to access the care they need. This growing challenge has many causes and will require bold action by the new governor, legislators, and a broad spectrum of stakeholders in the public and private sectors. At the core of this challenge is the simple fact that California does not have enough of the right types of health workers in the right places to meet the needs of its growing, aging, and increasingly diverse population.The California Future Health Workforce Commission has spent nearly two years focused on meeting this challenge, issuing a new report with recommendations for closing California’s growing workforce gaps by 2030…..

…..The Commission’s final report includes a set of 27 detailed recommendations within three key strategies that will be necessary for: (1) increasing opportunities for all Californians to advance in the health professions, (2) aligning and expanding education and training, and (3) strengthening the capacity, retention, and effectiveness of health workers. Throughout its deliberations, the Commission has focused on the need to increase the diversity of the state’s health workforce, enable the workforce to better address health disparities, and incorporate new and emerging technologies.

While advancing all 27 recommendations over the next decade will be important, the Commission has high-lighted 10 priority actions that its members have agreed would be among the most urgent and most impactful first step toward building the health workforce that California needs.

To make these proposals a reality, the Commission also recommended establishing statewide infrastructure, starting in 2019, to implement the recommendations in partnership with stakeholders, to monitor progress, and to make adjustments as needs and resources change. This statewide effort will need to be paired with strong regional partnerships to advance local workforce and education solutions.

The Commission’s 10 priorities for immediate action and implementation are:
1. Expand and scale pipeline programs to recruit and prepare students from underrepresented and low-income backgrounds for health careers….
2. Recruit and support college students, including community college students, from underrepresented regions and backgrounds to pursue health careers….
3. Support scholarships for qualified students who pursue priority health professions and serve in underserved communities….
4. Sustain and expand the Programs in Medical Education (PRIME) program across UC campuses….
5. Expand the number of primary care physician and psychiatry residency positions….
6. Recruit and train students from rural areas and other underresourced communities to practice in community health centers in their home regions….
7. Maximize the role of nurse practitioners as part of the care team to help fill gaps in primary care….
8. Establish and scale a universal home care worker family of jobs with career ladders and associated training….
9. Develop a psychiatric nurse practitioner program that recruits from and trains providers to serve in underserved rural and urban communities….
10. Scale the engagement of community health workers, promotores, and peer providers through certification, training, and reimbursement….

Together, the Commission’s prioritized recommendations will:
● Grow, support, and sustain California’s health work-force pipeline by reaching over 60,000 students and cultivating careers in the health professions.
● Increase the number of health workers by over47,000.
● Improve diversity in the health professions, producing approximately 30,000 workers from under-represented communities.
● Increase the supply of health professionals who come from and train in rural and other underserved communities.
● Train over 14,500 providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants), including over 3,000 underrepresented minority providers.
● Eliminate the shortage of primary care providers and nearly eliminate the shortage of psychiatrists.
● Train more frontline health workers who provide care where people live…..