Navigating Law Librarianship While Black: A Week in the Life of a Black Female Law Librarian

Source: Shamika D. Dalton, Gail Mathapo, and Endia Sowers-Paige, Law Library Journal, Vol. 110 no. 3, 2018
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The ideal work environment provides a sense of purpose and validation. Inevitably, however, unconscious or implicit biases permeate the workplace because we all have them. These biases can be based on race, age, gender, religion, socioeconomic status, physical disability, and other characteristics. Implicit bias in the workplace can “stymie diversity, recruiting and retention efforts, and unknowingly shape an organization’s culture.” People of color, in particular, experience challenges as a result of racial microaggressions in the workplace.

Racial microaggressions are “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.” Racial microaggressions may not raise an eyebrow right away, but they are harmful to the work environment. Due to their subtle nature, racial microaggressions can be “difficult to identify, quantify, and rectify.” For this reason,
Derald Wing Sue and colleagues identified three forms of racial microaggressions: microassaults, microinsults, and microinvalidations. …. For women of color, these effects are amplified as they have to endure both racial and gender microaggressions in the workplace. ….