Lowe’s Is Making Managers Sign Arbitration Agreements If They Want Their Bonuses

Source: Dave Jamieson, Huffington Post, May 29, 2018

We’re going to see a whole lot more of these “voluntary” agreements after last week’s Supreme Court ruling.

Lowe’s has a message for its store managers: Sign this or else.

Salaried managers and assistant managers at the big-box home improvement retailer are being required to enter binding arbitration agreements under the threat of losing their valuable bonuses, according to a copy of the contract obtained by HuffPost.

By signing the contract, managers agree they won’t take Lowe’s to court with any claims or join in class-action lawsuits against the company. Instead, any grievance they have must be taken individually and in private to an arbitrator ― an arrangement that could significantly cut back workers’ legal claims of unpaid work. ….

Related:
The Supreme Court’s Arbitration Ruling Is Already Screwing Thousands Of Chipotle Workers
Source: Dave Jamieson, Huffington Post, May 27, 2018

The burrito chain has asked a court to exclude 2,814 workers from a massive wage theft lawsuit because they signed mandatory arbitration agreements.

Editorial: Forced arbitration hides workplace abuses. No one should forfeit rights for a job
Source: Sacramento Bee, May 24, 2018

Forced Arbitration
Source: Economic Policy Institute, 2017

Forced arbitration, especially where it prohibits the use of a class action of any kind, can be very destructive of employee rights, undermines labor standards, and contributes to wage suppression, discrimination, and poorer working conditions.

The Supreme Court Favors Forced Arbitration at the Expense of Workers’ Rights
Source: Galen Sherwin, ACLU Women’s Rights Project, May 22, 2018

The #MeToo movement has offered an important lesson on the collective power of voices joining together to take on individual experiences of injustice. On Monday, the Supreme Court dealt a huge blow to precisely this kind of collective power, ruling against the ability of workers to join together to take on employment discrimination and abuse.

The court ruled that employers are free to force workers who have been victims of unfair labor practices into private arbitration to address their claims — even in cases where workers sought to bring a collective legal action. The decision came in a case about failure to pay overtime, but its implications are far broader and extend to many of the claims of harassment and discrimination that have surfaced thanks to the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements…..