Workplace violence in healthcare

Source: Journal of Healthcare Protection Management, Vol. 34 no. 1, 2018
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Articles include:

Team Wilson: how a single workplace violence incident changed healthcare security
Robert Rusting
A potential breakthrough in the need for hospital management to recognize the consequences of violence to nurses and other staff members and to take action to upgrade security result from CEO reactions to a horrendous incident in a Massachusetts hospital. The involvement of a nurses’ organization [the Massachusetts Nurses Association] in providing hospital management with the means to deal with the growing violence against staff is also detailed.

Aspects of combating terrorist activities in healthcare
Anthony Luizzo, Ben Scaglione
The keys to maintaining a terrorism-free workplace lies in the security administrator’s mastering of knowing how to capture terrorist threats before they wreak havoc on the institution and its surroundings, according to the authors, who provide in this article a wealth of sources to the administrator for obtaining such a mastery.

OSHA: focusing on healthcare’s continuing increase in workplace violence
Kevin Tuohey
Injuries to nurses, nursing assistants and other healthcare workers continue to be far more prevalent than in other industries and continue to grow in numbers. In this article, the author reviews new efforts to prevent and reduce workplace violence by OSHA and other agencies. He also describes in detail the activities of IAHSS in this area and makes recommendations about maximizing the expertise of healthcare security and safely.

Hospital settlement: OSHA spells out requirements for implementing a WPV program
In a settlement …. with Bergen Regional Medical Center (BRMC) researched in May 2017 and verified in September 2017, OSHA and one of the nation’s largest public hospitals have resolved litigation by reaching an agreement that requires the center to enhance its efforts to prevent violence in the workplace.