Unionized College Faculty Are Winning Themselves a Lot of Money

Source: Hamilton Nolan, Splinter, August 25, 2017

Unions are not just a feel-good sort of thing to do. New research about higher ed unions shows just how much workers have actually gained from organizing, in a short period of time.

One of the most active areas of new union organizing in America is higher education: adjunct professors and other academic and non-academic workers on college campuses, who tend to have shockingly low pay and poor job security even though they tend to be highly educated and work in prestigious settings. Those are the sort of ingredients that can motivate people to unionize. And voila: it has been so. And the gains have been clear. Duke University non-tenured faculty members who signed their first union contract this summer immediately got double digit raises and improved job security…..
Related:
SEIU Contract Highlights: The Union Difference
Source: SEIU, Faculty Forward, [2016]
….Unionized contingent faculty often have a higher rate of pay, regular salary increases and pay protections on work done outside of the classroom.
– Across the country, median pay per course was 25% higher for part-time faculty that had union representation…..
Job Security, Improved Benefits and Professional Development
Unionized contingent faculty have an increased level of job security, better benefits and 90 percent of SEIU faculty contracts have established professional development funds….

Unionizing Pays Big Dividend for Professors at Regional Public Universities
Source: Peter Schmidt, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 3, 2016

Full-time instructors at regional public universities earn an average of about $21,000, or nearly 25 percent, more in pay and benefits annually if they belong to a union, concludes a groundbreaking new study of compensation at such institutions. The location and size of the employer also makes a big difference. Those in larger suburban public universities, the highest-paying category of institutions studied, earned an average of nearly $17,000, or 20 percent, more in pay and benefits annually than those at midsize rural institutions, the lowest-paying category.