The effect of long working hours on cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease; A case-crossover study

Source: Kyong-sok Shin, Yun kyung Chung, Young-Jun Kwon, Jun-Seok Son and Se-hoon Lee, American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 60 Issue 9, September 2017
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Background:
This study investigated the relationship between weekly working hours and the occurrence of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases using a case-crossover study design.

Methods:
We investigated average working hours during the 7 days before the onset of illness (hazard period) and average weekly working hours between 8 days and 3 months before the onset of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases (control period) for 1,042 cases from the workers’ compensation database for 2009.

Results:
Among all subjects, the odds ratio by conditional logistic regression for the risk of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases with a 10 hr increase in average weekly working hours was 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–1.72), a significant association.

Conclusions:
An increase in average weekly working hours may trigger the onset of cerebro-cardiovascular disease.