An integrated model for road capacity choice and cordon toll pricing

Source: Qianwen Guo, Yanshuo Sun, Zhi-Chun Li, Zhongfei Li, Research in Transportation Economics, In Press – Corrected Proof, Available online 2 May 2017
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From the abstract:
In this paper, an analytical model is proposed to address road capacity choice and cordon toll pricing issues for an urban transportation corridor. In the proposed model, the road capacity, toll location and level are considered as decision variables, and the effects of self-financing and subsidy constraints on these variables are explored. It has been shown in the numerical studies that the self-financing requirement can lead to a decreased social welfare, and subsidies in certain ranges are welfare-improving. Results also show that subsidy increments yield disproportionately smaller welfare improvements, which is a sign of low efficiency.
Related:
From internal efficiency to societal benefits – Multi modal transport safety agency’s socio-economic impact analysis
Source: Petri Mononen, Pekka Leviäkangas, Harri Haapasalo, Research in Transportation Economics, In Press – Corrected Proof, Available online 9 May 2017
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From the abstract:
Pressures to cut public expenditure and to reach high value for money of projects that use scarce public money are evident across the globe. At the same time there seems to be a lack of decision support tools for pin-pointing whether public services are yielding net benefits. Accountability is called for but the ‘accounting systems’ that validate the right choices in service delivery are not yet thoroughly established. As a response, an impact evaluation via a real-world case study of a multi-modal transport safety agency is presented. The main contribution of this article is methodological, including a summary of study cordoning; description of methods to map impact mechanisms; quantification of socio-economic impacts of services; the benefit to cost (B/C) appraisal of services and service bundles, and evaluation of an agency’s overall B/C ratio by applying the findings to systems level. The described analytical process is repeatable elsewhere with modifications or as it stands.