Who stays, who goes, who knows? A state-wide survey of child welfare workers

Source: Austin Griffiths, David Royse, Kalee Culver, Kristine Piescher, Yanchen Zhang, Children and Youth Services Review, Volume 77, June 2017
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From the abstract:
Child welfare workforce turnover remains a significant problem with dire consequences. Designed to assist in its retention efforts, an agency supported state-wide survey was employed to capture worker feedback and insight into turnover. This article examines the quantitative feedback from a Southern state’s frontline child welfare workforce (N = 511), examining worker intent to leave as those who intend to stay employed at the agency (Stayers), those who are undecided (Undecided), and those who intend to leave (Leavers). A series of One-Way ANOVAs revealed a stratified pattern of worker dissatisfaction, with stayers reporting highest satisfaction levels, followed by undecided workers, and then leavers in all areas (e.g., salary, workload, recognition, professional development, accomplishment, peer support, and supervision). A Multinomial Logistic Regression model revealed significant (and shared) predictors among leavers and undecided workers in comparison to stayers with respect to dissatisfaction with workload and professional development, and working in an urban area. Additionally, child welfare workers who intend to leave the agency in the next 12 months expressed significant dissatisfaction with supervision and accomplishment, and tended to be younger and professionals of color.

Highlights
• Child welfare worker intent to leave is best examined through a continuum.
• A stratified pattern of dissatisfaction emerged when exploring this continuum.
• A multinomial logistic regression model revealed significant (and shared) predictors.