Long-Term Care Workforce: Better Information Needed on Nursing Assistants, Home Health Aides, and Other Direct Care Workers

Source: U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), GAO-16-718, August 16, 2016

From the summary:
Federal data sources provide a broad picture of direct care workers—nursing assistants and home health, psychiatric, and personal care aides—who provide long-term services and supports (LTSS), but limitations and gaps affect the data’s usefulness for workforce planning. Some states have collected data in areas where federal data are limited, but these have been one-time studies. Federal data show that direct care workers who provide LTSS numbered an estimated 3.27 million in 2014, or 20.8 percent of the nation’s health workforce. Federal data show that wages for direct care workers, while differing by occupation, are generally low, averaging between approximately $10 and $13 per hour in 2015. However it is unclear to what extent these wage data include direct care workers employed directly by the individuals for whom they care. The number of these workers, often referred to as independent providers, is believed to be significant and growing. Some states, in coordination with the federal government or on their own, have conducted studies about direct care workers and collected detailed information. These studies showed that a majority of independent providers worked for a family member or someone else they knew.