This is the script Uber is using to make anti-union phone calls to drivers in Seattle

Source: Alison Griswold, Quartz, February 22, 2016

Over the weekend, we reported on Uber’s stealthy new effort to dissuade drivers in Seattle from unionizing: It’s directing its US customer service representatives to call thousands of drivers for a satisfaction survey, and then having them deliver a spiel against organizing. Now you can read the script these reps are following….

…..Uber Rep: Just a couple final questions. Are you familiar with a new law passed recently by the Seattle City Council that would allow ride-sharing and taxi drivers to form unions and collectively bargain?

[If no] Would you be interested in learning more about it?

[If no] terminate.

[If yes] Let me share some thoughts on the ordinance. The Seattle City Council did vote to allow ride-sharing and taxi drivers to form unions and collectively bargain. However, ride-sharing, like Uber, is a case where collective bargaining and unionization do not fit the characteristics of how most partners use the Uber platform. Collective bargaining usually takes place in situations with a workforce of individuals who have a boss, work scheduled hours, usually full-time, and intend to make that job a career. That’s not how most Uber drivers use the platform. No two Uber partners are the same: 69% of Uber drivers have full- or part-time work outside of Uber, and 11% are students. Over half who drive in Seattle drive under 10 hours per week. This is simply a case where collective bargaining and unionization do not fit the characteristics of the work.

Thanks for your time and thanks again for partnering with Uber….
Related:
Uber is using its US customer service reps to deliver its anti-union message
Source: Alison Griswold, Quartz, February 20, 2016