Higher Education, College Degree Major, and Police Occupational Attitudes

Source: Eugene A. Paoline III, William Terrill & Michael T. Rossler, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, Volume 26 Issue 1, 2015
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From the abstract:
Existing police research has produced mixed results regarding the benefits of college education on the outlooks of officers. In addressing many of the well-documented methodological concerns of prior research, the current study augments the existing police education-occupational attitudes literature by examining the impact of varying levels of education (i.e. high school, some college, and bachelor’s degree and higher) on officers’ job satisfaction, views of top management, and role orientation(s). In addition, among those with a bachelor’s degree, the relevance of degree major on officers’ occupational outlooks is assessed. Our results address and inform advocacy efforts to make college education a bona fide occupational qualification.
Related:
Do College Grads Make Better Cops?
Source: Andy Henion, Futurity.org, February 9, 2015

College-educated police officers are more likely to be dissatisfied with their job. But they are less likely to use force on citizens, a new study shows. The research, which paints a broad picture of both the negative and positive effects of higher education on policing, also shows cops with a degree may have negative views of their supervisors. They’re also less likely to favor community policing, a strategy aimed partly at reducing the number of deadly police-citizen incidents that currently dominate the headlines…..