2012 NIGP Compensation Report

Source: NIGP: The Institute for Public Procurement and Public Procurement Research Center (PPRC), 2013

Understanding the developments in compensation structures within any profession is critical when constructing a strategic framework for the field’s future. The significant changes in the nature of governance of the last decade have imposed additional and increasingly more complex demands on public procurement specialists. Whether these increased demands are reflected in the levels of compensation could in large part dictate the pool of talent that local and federal governments will have available in terms of selecting their workforce. The research presented here is part of the popular Public Procurement Compensation Series and investigates, from an organizational perspective, the most recent compensation levels within the profession. The two-fold purpose of this research is to offer a snap shot of the compensation levels across several dimensions and to provide practice-driven and useful compensation benchmarks. …

… A total of 319 American and Canadian agencies have participated in this edition of the survey. Based on their responses three primary trends were identified. First, bonuses have not been a prevalent part of compensation in 2011 or 2012; however, in 2012 agencies were more likely to offer bonuses to their employees. Second, after an accentuated dip from 2008 – 2010, salaries for most positions have been experiencing a recovering trend. Outside a small number of exceptions, reported compensation levels have not reached their previous peaks. Finally, a large proportion of agencies are asking their procurement specialists to work overtime without additional pay…