Health care versus non-health care businesses’ experiences during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: Financial impact, vaccination policies, and control measures implemented

Source: Terri Rebmann, Jing Wang, Zachary Swick, David Reddick, Corina Minden-Birkenmaier, AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control, published online 31 January 2013
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From the abstract:
Only limited data are available on businesses’ experiences related to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in terms of interventions implemented, staffing shortages, employees working while ill, and H1N1 vaccination policy. A questionnaire was administered to human resource professionals during May-July 2011 to assess US businesses’ experiences related to the 2009 pandemic. …In all, 471 human resource professionals participated. Most did not work while ill. Twelve percent reported staffing shortages, 2.1% needed to hire temporary staff, and fewer than 1% reduced workload or closed during the pandemic. From logistic and linear regressions, determinants of providing employees H1N1 influenza training, respiratory hygiene education, offering H1N1 vaccine to employees, and higher infection prevention intervention scores were size of the business (with larger businesses implementing more interventions, such as providing education and vaccine, than smaller businesses) and being a health care agency…. Businesses should continue to improve business continuity and pandemic plans to prepare for the next biologic event (ie, pandemic, bioterrorism attack, or emerging infectious disease outbreak)….
Related:
Business continuity and pandemic preparedness: US health care versus non-health care agencies
Source: Terri Rebmann, Jing Wang, Zachary Swick, David Reddick, Corina Minden-Birkenmaier, AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control, published online 21 January 2013
(subscription required)