Losing a Job: The Nonpecuniary Cost of Unemployment in the United States

Losing a Job: The Nonpecuniary Cost of Unemployment in the United States
Source: Cristobal Young, Social Forces, Vol. 91 no. 2, December 2012
(subscription required)

From the abstract:
Drawing on the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, I track the subjective well-being of individuals as they enter and exit unemployment. Job loss is a salient trigger event that sets off large changes in well-being. The factors expected to improve the lot of the unemployed have limited efficacy: (1) changes in family income are not significantly correlated with well-being; (2) unemployment insurance eligibility seems to partly mitigate the effect of job loss, but is a poor substitute for work; and (3) even reemployment recovers only about two thirds of the initial harm of job loss, indicating a potential long-term scar effect of unemployment. This highlights the deep and intractable hardship caused by unemployment in America….