Knowing What Works in Health Care: A Roadmap for the Nation

Source: Jill Eden, Ben Wheatley, Barbara McNeil, and Harold Sox, Institute of Medicine/National Academies Press, 2008
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From press release:
Solutions to some of the nation’s most pressing health problems hinge on the ability to identify which diagnostic, treatment, and prevention services work best for various patients and circumstances. Spending on ineffective care contributes to rising health costs and insurance premiums. Variations in how health care providers treat the same conditions reflect uncertainty and disagreement about what the standards for clinical practice should be. Patients and insurers cannot always be confident that health professionals are delivering the most effective care.

A new report from the Institute of Medicine offers a blueprint for a national program to assess the effectiveness of clinical services and to provide credible, unbiased information about what really works in health care. The report recommends that Congress direct the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to establish a program with the authority, expertise, and resources necessary to set priorities for evaluating clinical services and to conduct systematic reviews of the evidence. This program would also be responsible for developing and promoting rigorous standards for clinical practice guidelines, which could help minimize the use of questionable services and target services to the patients most likely to benefit, said the committee that wrote the report.
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