Assaults on Days of Campaign Rallies During the 2016 US Presidential Election

Source: Christopher N. Morrison, Benjamin Ukert, Aimee Palumbo, Beidi Dong, Sara Jacoby, Douglas, J. Wiebe, Epidemiology, Published Ahead-of-Print, Post Acceptance: March 12, 2018
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From the abstract:
This study investigates whether assault frequency increased on days and in cities where candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton held campaign rallies prior to the 2016 US Presidential election.

We calculated city-level counts of police-reported assaults for 31 rallies for Donald Trump and 38 rallies for Hillary Clinton. Negative binomial models estimated the assault incidence on rally days (Day 0) relative to that on 8 control days for the same city (Days -28, -21, -14, -7, +7, +14, +21, and +28).

Cities experienced an increase in assaults (Incidence Rate Ratio [IRR]=1.12, 95%CI: 1.03-1.22) on the days of Donald Trump’s rallies, and no change in assaults on the days of Hillary Clinton’s rallies (IRR=1.00, 95%CI: 0.94-1.06).

Assaults increased on days when cities hosted Donald Trump’s rallies during the 2016 Presidential election campaign.

America’s Growing ‘Guard Labor’ Force

Source: Richard Florida, City Lab, March 13, 2018

Many large urban areas in the U.S. now have more “guard labor” than teachers. ….

…. Our definition of guard labor is narrower than that of Bowles and Jayadev, limited to what they call “protective guard labor”—that is, police officers and detectives, prison guards, private security guards, transportation security screeners, and other protective service workers. Our definition of teachers includes pre-school, elementary, middle-school, and high-school teachers, as well as special-education teachers.

For each metro, we looked at the change in guard labor over time, the number of guards per 10,000 people, the location quotient for guard labor, and—most importantly for our purposes—the ratio of guards to teachers. ….

Libraries Respond to #MeToo Movement

Source: Julia Eisenstein, American Library Association, March 9, 2018

Libraries have long been in the forefront when it comes to responding to social justice issues. The current focus on the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements are no exception. ….

…. The University of Minnesota (U of M) Libraries runs a regular blog titled A Matter of Facts. Kimberly Clarke and Karen Carmody-McIntosh wrote the February 7 post Me Too: Hashtag and Social Movement. In it contains links to resources regarding the origin of the #MeToo movement Helpful books, ebooks, databases, journal articles are available only to U of M faculty and students, but the Newspaper, Magazine articles and websites are available for anyone to view.

Many academic libraries are creating LibGuides on sexual harassment providing links to resources for both scholars who are researching sexual harassment and survivors of sexual harassment. Examples include Tulane University’s Howard Tilton Memorial Library guide on Sexual Violence Prevention Resources, the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign guide on Sexual Harassment, and New York’s Adelphi University guide on Sexual Harassment Resources. ….

Harassment Resources

Do Not Let Love Turn Into Liability

Source: Maureen Minehan, Employment Alert, Volume 35, Issue 6, March 20, 2018
(subscription required)

Romeo and Juliet lost their lives for love. In modern times, jobs are often what’s at risk.

While not every office romance ends badly, many do, both personally and professionally. A new survey by global outplacement and executive coaching firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas found that when workplace courtships go awry, 33% of the time they end up in termination for at least one person. …. Over 62% of HR executives said they have had to deal with a failed or inappropriate relationship at work. While one-third ended in at least one person’s separation from the company, another 17% of employers moved one party to a different department. Five percent of these failed relationships led to litigation. ….

The Lessons of West Virginia

Source: Eric Blanc, Jacobin, March 9, 2018

West Virginia’s historic wildcat strike has the potential to change everything. ….

…. The Great West Virginia Wildcat is the single most important labor victory in the US since at least the early 1970s. Though the 1997 UPS strike and the 2012 Chicago teachers’ strike also captured the country’s attention, there’s something different about West Virginia. This strike was statewide, it was illegal, it went wildcat, and it seems to be spreading. ….

Suddenly, the Unemployable Are Finding Jobs

Source: Meagan Day, Jacobin, March 14, 2018

With a tightening labor market, CEOs are chasing after the same workers they once derided as unemployable. ….

The post-2008 recession and slow recovery witnessed a spate of reporting and commentary on the so-called “skills gap”. The gist of the argument was that if rates of joblessness remained stubbornly high, it was because workers weren’t good enough for existing jobs: they needed better education, better preparatory training, better skills, and resumes. The bottom line was that workers needed to fix themselves to fit into the economy — not the other way around.

As the economic recovery accelerates, the spuriousness of that argument comes into ever-sharper relief. It turns out corporations were just being picky, taking advantage of a slack labor market and weak demand for their products to discard twenty or a hundred job applications at a time in search of the one perfect employee who — beleaguered by competition and desperate for employment — would work for the wages of an imperfect one.

How do we know that was happening? Because it’s starting to not happen anymore. The labor market is tightening, and companies’ hiring standards are plummeting — showing just how cooked-up those standards were to begin with…..

Federal Work-Life Survey Results

Source: U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM), March 2018

From the memo:
The key findings of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) Federal Work-Life Survey administered January 25 to March 10, 2017. This memorandum highlights the Federal workforce’s use and impact of work-life programs and provides guidance for agencies. OPM’s analysis indicates a significant relationship between participation in work-life programs and optimal organizational performance, retention, and job satisfaction. These outcomes emphasize the value of work-life programs as strategic tools that support organizational effectiveness. At the same time, there are opportunities for improvement through expanding support and reducing barriers to utilizing these programs…..